krishna Reddy

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About krishna Reddy

  1. Thank you for your reply. It answers my question. The assembly has the highest authority over the board and can alter the board's actions as needed. The Webster RONR is easy to read and follow. There is no need for our editorial comment. See below. Their book is also very popular. The Third Edition of "Robert's Rules of Order: Simplified & Applied.” Since 1998 when the First Edition was published, it has been one of the most popular books on Robert's Rules of Order sold worldwide. Robert McConnell Productions is proud to announce the publication of our book, the Third Edition of "Robert's Rules of Order: Simplified & Applied.” Since 1998 when the First Edition was published, it has been one of the most popular books on Robert's Rules of Order sold worldwide.
  2. The question I asked is not which book is better. The content is the issue. Can you comment on the content?
  3. I posed the same to Webster 3ed edition. The content is important. Do you agree with the content I posed whether the assembly has higher authority and whether the board can exceed their authority over the assembly.
  4. I have both books one from RONR 11th edition and the 3rd edition of Websters RONR. I find the information below very useful. I could only find few points similar in the 11th edition of RONR> in our religious organization where we have constitution separate from bylaws. The board can amend the bylaws. However, they made few bylaws that are not in conformity with the constitution articles. Our C & BL committee recommended the board to have the bylaws approved y the assembly. One member is contesting that Board had the authority and assemble does not have authority. Your thoughts please! WHERE DOES IT SAY WE CAN’T DO IT? Organizations today are faced with many problems. One of the biggest problems is officers or members trying to do something that is not provided for in the governing documents. They justify their actions by the question, “Where does it say we can’t do it?” A very important point concerning governing documents is that they are written in the positive. They define what officers, members and committees can do, not what they can’t do. By assigning duties, setting dates of meetings and previous notice, specifying nominating and election procedures, and other bylaw requirements, the governing documents are limiting action. The members must act within the boundaries set by their adopted rules. If something is not mentioned in the bylaws or parliamentary authority, they cannot do it unless they change their governing documents. So when there is a question whether something can be done, the question to be answered is: “Where does it say we can do it?” Answer this and the problem will be resolved in the correct way. Robert McConnell Productions. Webster's New World Robert's Rules of Order Simplified and Applied, Third Edition (p. 299). Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Kindle Edition.