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mjhmjh

Does a committee with the power to act also have the power to execute?

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Say the motion "That the Society have a booth at the county fair, with up to $500 spent on registration and giveaways" is referred to a committee, and that committee is given the power to act. The committee then passes the motion as is. Would being given the power to act also give the committee the power to execute that motion, or would that have to be specified elsewhere in the motion?

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 I would interpret a motion to give the committee the authority to act as equivalent to a motion granting the committee full power to carry out its recommendations. However, it is ultimately up to the society to determine the intent of the motion.

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Guest Who's Coming to Dinner

This question cannot be answered without knowing the wording of the motion to refer.

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10 minutes ago, Guest Who's Coming to Dinner said:

This question cannot be answered without knowing the wording of the motion to refer.

How could a motion be worded to give a committee executive authority?

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Guest Who's Coming to Dinner

"I move to amend the motion by striking the words 'Society have' and inserting the words 'Events Committee set up and operate, at its discretion.'"

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34 minutes ago, mjhmjh said:

How could a motion be worded to give a committee executive authority?

On page 175 178, RONR suggests language as simple as this:  "I move that the question be referred to the Executive Board with full power";  Just substitute the appropriate committee name for "executive board".

On page 490, it is explained what the term "with power" means:  "When a committee is appointed "with power," this means with power to take all the steps necessary to carry out its instructions."

Edited by Richard Brown
corrected erroneous page number

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Guest Nancy N,
10 hours ago, Richard Brown said:

On page 175 178, RONR suggests language as simple as this:  "I move that the question be referred to the Executive Board with full power";  Just substitute the appropriate committee name for "executive board".

On page 490, it is explained what the term "with power" means:  "When a committee is appointed "with power," this means with power to take all the steps necessary to carry out its instructions."

So what does "full" mean?

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4 hours ago, Guest Nancy N, said:

So what does "full" mean?

I don't think there's a distinction in RONR between power and full power. It seems to me that Richard added the second paragraph of his post after posting and simply forgot to amend the first paragraph.

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18 hours ago, mjhmjh said:

I don't think there's a distinction in RONR between power and full power. It seems to me that Richard added the second paragraph of his post after posting and simply forgot to amend the first paragraph.

Thank you, mjh; anybody else on this, please?

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19 hours ago, mjhmjh said:

I don't think there's a distinction in RONR between power and full power. It seems to me that Richard added the second paragraph of his post after posting and simply forgot to amend the first paragraph.

 

45 minutes ago, Gary c Tesser said:

Thank you, mjh; anybody else on this, please?

Yeah. What did Richard forget to amend in his first paragraph?

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4 hours ago, Daniel H. Honemann said:

 

Yeah. What did Richard forget to amend in his first paragraph?

Maybe he forgot to explain what the book is talking about. After all, doesn't every committee have the power to take all the steps necessary to carry out its instructions? (Or at least as much power as it could be given by the body that issued those instructions.)

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23 hours ago, mjhmjh said:

I don't think there's a distinction in RONR between power and full power. It seems to me that Richard added the second paragraph of his post after posting and simply forgot to amend the first paragraph.

 

3 hours ago, Daniel H. Honemann said:

 

Yeah. What did Richard forget to amend in his first paragraph?

I quoted directly from RONR in both paragraphs, so I,  too, am wondering what I "forgot" to amend in the first paragraph. :)

RONR uses the term"full power" in the quote in the first paragraph and uses the word"power" in the quote in the second paragraph. I don't see any meaningful difference between the two terms in the context in which they are used. 

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4 hours ago, Daniel H. Honemann said:

 

Yeah. What did Richard forget to amend in his first paragraph?

 

26 minutes ago, Shmuel Gerber said:

Maybe he forgot to explain what the book is talking about. After all, doesn't every committee have the power to take all the steps necessary to carry out its instructions? (Or at least as much power as it could be given by the body that issued those instructions.)

 

23 minutes ago, Richard Brown said:

I quoted directly from RONR in both paragraphs, so I,  too, am wondering what I "forgot" to amend in the first paragraph. :)

RONR uses the term"full power" in the quote in the first paragraph and uses the word"power" in the quote in the second paragraph. I don't see any meaningful difference between the two terms in the context in which they are used. 

My bad, he didn't forget to amend anything. Both the terms "power" and "full power" appear in RONR so I think it just depends on what comes after the word "power." Lines 5-14 on page 172 seem to support my take.

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Until this conversation, I would have assumed full power to mean controlling the actions of the organization during a particular time, and power to refer to having control over a particular item, but it seems that there's no significance attached to full.

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4 hours ago, Godelfan said:

Until this conversation, I would have assumed full power to mean controlling the actions of the organization during a particular time, and power to refer to having control over a particular item, but it seems that there's no significance attached to full.

Until this post of Godelfan's, this take would not have occurred to me, but now -- sorry, Gandalf --  I think I like it.

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1 hour ago, Gary c Tesser said:

Until this post of Godelfan's, this take would not have occurred to me, but now -- sorry, Gandalf --  I think I like it.

If you really want to get more deeply involved with this I suggest you consider regarding what is said on page 490 as referring primarily to committees assigned to perform some particular task, as described in (5) on pages 279-280 of PL, and not a board or committee to which a pending motion is referred by adoption of a subsidiary motion to Commit, with "full power" to resolve it as described on page 178 of RONR, and as discussed in PL in (5) on pages 49-50.

I'd discuss all this further with you here, and at length, were it not for the fact that I don't like to type (and that I think you ought to be researching this stuff yourself).

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I'd look it up but Richard Brown was going to buy me a copy of PL in San Antonio in 2003 but Rod Davidson and his sister went and dragged us off to lunch or dinner, day after day, and we never got around to it.  Also it was September and my birthday six months away (unlike now).

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