bigred73

First reading/second reading

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The local Planning Commission recommended a zoning change and then passed it along to City Council as required. There is then supposed to be a public hearing and three readings.  The public hearing was held and then it went to City Council for the first reading. A motion to reject the proposed zoning change passed by a six to 1 vote on first reading at the City Council meeting.  Is there still a second reading (and ultimately a third reading) since the zoning change was not approved at first reading or does it die and no second reading occurs at the next Council meeting? If a second reading is required and there is a vote that supports the change does that vote take precedence over the vote at the first reading? I can't find the answer in any city by-laws, policies  etc.  In fact I can't find any statement of the purpose of a first reading.

Thanks for any help.

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4 minutes ago, bigred73 said:

The local Planning Commission recommended a zoning change and then passed it along to City Council as required. There is then supposed to be a public hearing and three readings.  The public hearing was held and then it went to City Council for the first reading. A motion to reject the proposed zoning change passed by a six to 1 vote on first reading at the City Council meeting.  Is there still a second reading (and ultimately a third reading) since the zoning change was not approved at first reading or does it die and no second reading occurs at the next Council meeting? If a second reading is required and there is a vote that supports the change does that vote take precedence over the vote at the first reading? I can't find the answer in any city by-laws, policies  etc.  In fact I can't find any statement of the purpose of a first reading.

Thanks for any help.

RONR contains no requirement for multiple readings at different meetings, and therefore offers no rules to cite for you.  You'll need to check with council's attorney (or solicitor if you live in PA or in some parts of the Free State of Maryland) to help find the answer.

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