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Leo

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  • Birthday 07/09/1943

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  1. Thank you George. This will help those studying for the RP exam.
  2. Thank you George. This will help with those studying for the RP exam.
  3. I believe the statements on pages 66 & 126, lead to the following. If the motion stated above is immediately pending, the motion to postpone indefinitely is the subsidiary motion. If the motion stated above is not pending the motion to postpone indefinitely cannot be made. Therefore, the motion to postpone indefinitely cannot be made without a main motion immediately pending.
  4. Thank you Dan. A questions related to postpone indefinitely is in the In Order Study Guide for the NAP Registration Examination, part II, question 14. I was working with a group studying for the exam and could not think of an example.
  5. On page 66, under incidental main motions corresponding to subsidiary motions, for each of the subsidiary motions except the previous question and lay on the table, there is a corresponding incidental main motion of the same name that can be made when no other motion is pending. On page 126, under standard descriptive characteristics 2, postpone indefinitely can can be made only while a main question is immediately pending. How are these two apparently contradictory statements be reconciled? Can someone give an example of the motion to postpone indefinitely as an incidental motion?
  6. Can a main motion that normally requires a majority vote contain within itself a requirement that its adoption requires a two-thirds vote?
  7. The bylaws of a national association inc., state, "a special meeting of a local constituent association inc., may be called by the president of the state association inc." The bylaws are silent on who conducts the called special meeting. Does the state association president call the special meeting, and the local constituent association's duly elected officers conduct the special meeting? or Does the state association president call the special meeting of the local constituent association and conduct the special meeting?
  8. Well, the question as to whether or not a board can give instructions to delegates depends upon whether or not the board is the "constituent society or unit" being represented by those delegates (or is properly acting in behalf of such constituent society or unit pursuant to its authority). Only the entity being represented by a delegation can give instructions to that delegation. Based solely upon what has been posted so far, I'm not sure if this is the case, but you're the guy with the facts. Dan's most recent posting points out something I overlooked. Although members of the board are delegates to the convention, the local constituent units are the only units represented by the delegates. There is no bylaw indicating the board of directors is represented by any delegates.
  9. I believe page 606, lines 15 - 30. answers the question. The board at its meeting prior to the convention could adopt a motion with the appropriate wording indicating the members of the board shall support the motion in debate on the floor at the convention.
  10. I think (OP can clarify) I interpret this differently. I think "Board members" refrs to the members of the Board of the member institutiuons, not the Board of the association meeting. So, for example, if this was the National Convention of the Raccoon Loges of the US and each Local Raccoon Lodge sent delegates to the annual convention and those delegates were board members of the local lodges, what would be the contraints on these board members of the local Raccoon Lodges? In this case the delegates are members of the national board of the Raccoon Lodges of the US.
  11. According to the bylaws, members of the board are delegates to the annual convention, along with other delegates representing their constituent units. Also according to the bylaws, a submitted resolution is approved by the board and presented at the convention, on behalf of the board, for adoption. Can a member of the board, being delegate, debate against the motion?
  12. Page 448, line 5, sates "If a person holds an office in a society of which he is not a member and the bylaws make that officer an ex-officio member of the board, the nonmember is thereby a full fledged board member with all the accompanying rights; but this does not make him a member of the society." Can this rule be applied to the assembly at meetings? It would read as follows "If a person holds an office in a society of which he is not a member and the bylaws make that officer an ex-officio member of the assembly, the nonmember is thereby a full fledged assembly member with all the accompanying rights; but this does not make him a member of the society."
  13. What is the reason for not allowing reconsideration in a committee of the whole? RORN page 330, lines 11-12 A vote cannot be reconsidered in a committee of the whole, and on page 533,starting on line 4 the motion to reconsider is not listed as one of those being in order in a committee of the whole.
  14. 1 A motion is adopted by a board. 2 Many months later, the motion is amended by striking the last sentence. 3 Several months later, the board wants the last sentence placed back in the motion. Does the board move to rescind the amendment? or Does the board move to amend the motion by adding the last sentence?
  15. I wasn't sure about the other examples, but this one is a very good example for a presentation on committees. Thank you.
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