Jump to content
The Official RONR Q & A Forums

President's Report


dbpc2000

Recommended Posts

In a small 6 member board can the President make a motion at the end of his report as other members do after their reports? If so, is their need to turn the chair over to VP?

In small boards, the president usually participates in the proceedings just like any other board member, without relinquishing the chair. See RONR (10th ed.), p. 471, ll. 7-11.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In a small 6 member board

can the President make a motion at the end of his report

as other members do after their reports?

If so, is their need to turn the chair over to VP?

Stand by ... my crystal ball is beeping at me . . .

Q. Is the motion you refer to like this one? -- "I move that my report be accepted."

That, of course is improper, no matter who makes the motion.

(See RONR for a very rare exception.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In a small 6 member board can the President make a motion at the end of his report as other members do after their reports? If so, is their need to turn the chair over to VP?

The rule is that a committee report may be moved by the member reporting, but officers' reports are not. So in general the answer is no, and neither should the others.

But in a small board the rules are relaxed; the question is, is this rule among those that are relaxed?

I'm not next to The Book at the moment. Stay tuned.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The rule is that a committee report may be moved by the member reporting, but officers' reports are not. So in general the answer is no, and neither should the others.

But in a small board the rules are relaxed; the question is, is this rule among those that are relaxed?

I'm not next to The Book at the moment. Stay tuned.

I see no reason why the formality mentioned in RONR (10th ed.), p. 459, ll. 22-24, need be observed in small boards when the president seconds motions, engages in debate, and votes right along with the other members.

Edited to strike out the mention of seconding motions, since this formality is omitted in small boards, also. --R. E.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is very informal but we always have someone second a motion.

On past boards all members made motions during their reports. Presidents made motions, debated, & did not relinquish the chair.

I just wanted to know if it was proper to do so.

Thank you to all who answered. This forum is very helpful. I enjoy reading it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is very informal but we always have someone second a motion.

You may wish to reconsider this. The purpose of a second is to help ensure that the motion is worth the assembly's time. In an assembly of twenty or thirty people, it's probably not worth debating something only one person wants to consider. In a board with only six members, even one member is a fairly significant portion of the board. At the other extreme, large conventions with hundreds of members will often adopt rules requiring additional signatures for a motion to be considered.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is very informal but we always have someone second a motion.

You may wish to reconsider this.

While I'm in no way suggesting this is bad advice, I'd suggest that it would be a good idea (should you decide to follow Mr. Martin's suggestion) to explain to the group that the relaxed rules of small board meetings don't require a second to place a question before the assembly, and that is the reason to cease the practice. Someone may get the impression that the rules are being "broken", creating unease and distrust among the ranks. Foregoing the brief moment of time required for a member to say "I second" is no great time saver, but everyone should understand that it is indeed proper to skip that step. Education is a wonderful thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...