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Call for Resignation


Guest Carmen

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I am preparing to attend our next meeting, where I will be protecting my parlimentary rights. We are into our second year with NO bylaws in place, so Roberts Rules are all that we are using. This is the only organization I have ever been a part of, that did not have any bylaws, so this is new to me. From all the reading and research I've done, I can't find anything on the subject of the chair (or anyone else) asking/demanding/requesting resignations of members in good standing.

So my question put forth is:

Does the Chair have any right to call for the resignation of myself or any other member?

A second question:

An email was sent out by our Chair. It had on it, an amendment to a motion that was previously made at a meeting, that all members were to vote on. I was excluded from voting both times because of a "conflict of interest" which I now know was against my parlimentary rights.

Do the members have a right to obtain a copy of the voting results? It was not secret ballot.

TIA

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Does the Chair have any right to call for the resignation of myself or any other member?

Sure, he can call for someone's resignation but since a resignation is a voluntary act that person is free to decline.

An email was sent out by our Chair. It had on it, an amendment to a motion that was previously made at a meeting, that all members were to vote on. I was excluded from voting both times because of a "conflict of interest" which I now know was against my parlimentary rights.

Do the bylaws allow voting by email? If they don't you all can't do it (RONR p. 2 footnote, p. 244d, p. 255, pp. 408-409).

Do the members have a right to obtain a copy of the voting results? It was not secret ballot.

If the votes were counted the results (with numbers) should have been included in the minutes.

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Without bylaws?

Ask the chairman (of what RONR would describe as a "mass meeting") HOW will he know when you are no longer a "member" if you do "resign".

Read up on Mass Meetings in RONR, p. 526 ff. In a mass meeting, if you are there, you are a "member" unless the folks "sponsoring" the meeting define ahead of time who is welcome (and let in the door) and, by that definition, who is a member.

Where was that "conflict of interest" defined? Where is "good standing" defined?

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We are into our second year with NO bylaws in place, so Roberts Rules are all that we are using.

It is not wise to operate for such a long period of time without Bylaws. Your organization should create Bylaws as soon as possible. See RONR, 10th ed., Section 54: Organization of a Permanent Society, and Section 56: Content and Composition of Bylaws.

Does the Chair have any right to call for the resignation of myself or any other member?

Well, he can call for it, but you or any other member can refuse. Resignation is, by definition, a voluntary act.

An email was sent out by our Chair. It had on it, an amendment to a motion that was previously made at a meeting, that all members were to vote on.

E-mail voting is null and void unless it is authorized by the Bylaws (and it isn't, since you have no Bylaws). The vote is null and void.

Do the members have a right to obtain a copy of the voting results?

The results should be included in the minutes in some form (depending on how the vote was taken), but since the vote is null and void anyway I wouldn't worry too much about the results.

Ask the chairman (of what RONR would describe as a "mass meeting") HOW will he know when you are no longer a "member" if you do "resign".

Well, I suppose if someone resigned from a temporary society they would just stop showing up. :)

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