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Annual Meeting/Election of Officers


Guest Joanna French

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Guest Joanna French

Yesterday we held our annual meeting which included our election of officers. We had six (6) counters for the opening of ballots. It seems that there was a tie between two candidates. One of the counters took it upon themselves to approach one of the tied candidates and advise him to drop out since he was delinquent in his property taxes and therefore not qualified. The candidate felt pressured and dropped out at the time of the election. Is this legal or should we hold a run off election. I am worried that the BOD is going to look like the election was slanted in their favor even though the counter took it upon themselves to do this without the knowledge of the BOD. Please advise.

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Yesterday we held our annual meeting which included our election of officers. We had six (6) counters for the opening of ballots. It seems that there was a tie between two candidates. One of the counters took it upon themselves to approach one of the tied candidates and advise him to drop out since he was delinquent in his property taxes and therefore not qualified. The candidate felt pressured and dropped out at the time of the election. Is this legal or should we hold a run off election. I am worried that the BOD is going to look like the election was slanted in their favor even though the counter took it upon themselves to do this without the knowledge of the BOD. Please advise.

Well, the candidate was under no obligation to withdraw from the election (at least as far as RONR is concerned) so the withdrawal was voluntary and done now and whoever was elected stays in office. However, the teller (what you call a "counter") should be told to stick to his job of counting the ballots and leave the rule enforcement to the assembly itself. Also, unless your bylaws say otherwise a member is not deprived of his rights just because he is in arrears with his dues, behind in his property taxes, or owing the corner bookie money for picking the Steelers in the Super Bowl.

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Yesterday we held our annual meeting which included our election of officers. We had six (6) counters for the opening of ballots. It seems that there was a tie between two candidates. One of the counters took it upon themselves to approach one of the tied candidates and advise him to drop out since he was delinquent in his property taxes and therefore not qualified. The candidate felt pressured and dropped out at the time of the election. Is this legal or should we hold a run off election. I am worried that the BOD is going to look like the election was slanted in their favor even though the counter took it upon themselves to do this without the knowledge of the BOD. Please advise.

After a tie was announced and the guy withdrew, did you have a subsequent round of balloting?

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Yesterday we held our annual meeting which included our election of officers. We had six (6) counters for the opening of ballots. It seems that there was a tie between two candidates. One of the counters took it upon themselves to approach one of the tied candidates and advise him to drop out since he was delinquent in his property taxes and therefore not qualified. The candidate felt pressured and dropped out at the time of the election. Is this legal or should we hold a run off election. I am worried that the BOD is going to look like the election was slanted in their favor even though the counter took it upon themselves to do this without the knowledge of the BOD. Please advise.

No, there is no such thing as a "run off" election in RONR. You vote until someone gets a majority, and nobody is dropped unless they voluntarily withdraw--which your guy apparently did, after some terrible advice from one of your tellers.

But your election is incomplete. Nobody ever got a majority vote, so you still need to finish the election. People are still free to vote for the guy who supposedly withdrew, and he can change his mind and ask people to vote for him anyway.

The teller who acted improperly should probably be subject to a vote of censure. That's really bad behavior, and not his place to suggest. Is there actually language in your bylaws relating to property taxes and election as an officer? It sounds made up.

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