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Motion


Guest Mason

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When can the Chairman rule a motion legally obtained out of order and can the petitioner appeal to the body?

Not sure what you mean by "legally obtained", but there are a number of circumstances in which a motion would in fact be out of order. Why don't you give us a little more to go on, before we start unloading birdshot into the night sky above our heads.

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Not sure what you mean by "legally obtained", but there are a number of circumstances in which a motion would in fact be out of order. Why don't you give us a little more to go on, before we start unloading birdshot into the night sky above our heads.

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When can the Chairman rule a motion legally obtained out of order ...

"When"?

Uh ... -- when the motion is not in order.

That's "when."

It is a legitimate function of the chair to rule out of order motions which are not in order.

... can the petitioner appeal to the body?

Unknown.

In general:

Where a chair has ruled a motion as being "not in order", an appeal (e.g., "I move to appeal from the decision of the chair.") could be raised.

See RONR for exceptions.

With that said, whether your "petitioner" can appeal, is unknown. -- Q. Who is the petitioner, and what relation is he to the body which is meeting?

Anybody present can make the motion to appeal.

It need not be the original person who made the motion.

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With that said, whether your "petitioner" can appeal, is unknown. -- Q. Who is the petitioner, and what relation is he to the body which is meeting?

Anybody present can make the motion to appeal.

To pick a nit, I think it would be safer to say any member present can make the motion to appeal. Who knows the makeup of the peanut gallery at this meeting?:huh:

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Did the captcha captch him? Poor Mason.

Actually, the fact that Mason posted at all means he got past the sentinel at the gate, but fell victim to the confusing array of button options that often leads to this sort of non-post.

Mason - give it another try, but keep in mind that after you click on the "Reply" button, you want to enter your response before clicking on the "Add Reply" button.

Where you see the quoted text, and at the end you'll see

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