Jump to content
The Official RONR Q & A Forums

president's absence


Guest Jay c.

Recommended Posts

I am a member of an organizatuion which is, in effect, a small residential/religious community. People do own homes (they are termed "lease-holders")in the community, but are required to live there only during certain times of the year (when we will have more outside visitors). Some residents do live there year-round. The President must be a lease-holder, but it is not specified that the President must be a year-round resident. Our current President is a year-round resident, but her job requires her to travel frequently during the week days. She is usually at her home on weekends. Customarily, if something occurred which required the President's input at a time when the President was at work or out-of-town, the President would be called by telephone or would be emailed, and that decision would stand. We now have a group of people who want to have the Vice-President make the day-to-day decisions if the President is at work or out-of-town. Our bylaws state that the "vice-president will take over the duties of the president during te president's absence." "The President's absence" has customarily been interpretted as when the President was gone for an extended period of time, or was ill, or some such. Can the people who want to change the interpretation of this bylaw just say "it's going to be this way now" or must it be discussed and clarified by the assembly? Or is there something else that I'm not seeing?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Customarily, if something occurred which required the President's input at a time when the President was at work or out-of-town, the President would be called by telephone or would be emailed, and that decision would stand.

To me, this statement is cause for some concern. When your president is temporarily unavailable are you really just seeking her input, or is she actually relaying decisions on what to do? How much authority for deciding issues does your bylaws give to your president? Many homeowners associations have a board which handles the business of the association, and the absence of any one member, even the president, will usually not prevent the board from conducting business (which RONR states must be done at meetings). If your association has such a board, why couldn't they function, with the vice president presiding, in the absence of the president?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To me, this statement is cause for some concern. When your president is temporarily unavailable are you really just seeking her input, or is she actually relaying decisions on what to do? How much authority for deciding issues does your bylaws give to your president? Many homeowners associations have a board which handles the business of the association, and the absence of any one member, even the president, will usually not prevent the board from conducting business (which RONR states must be done at meetings). If your association has such a board, why couldn't they function, with the vice president presiding, in the absence of the president?

I think these are things that need to be done between board meetings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As Josh pointed out, it sounds as if decisions are being made between meetings. During these times, neither the board nor membership is gathered in any one location, but ostensibly spread out each in their own "real world."

Past practice has been to call or email the president for her input, which of course makes perfect sense, since there is no meeting taking place and all members are wherever they are at the time (work, home, shopping, vacation, etc). The correctness of this process notwithstanding, I'd have to say that I don't think the president can be absent barring a bylaw-level definition of that term, related perhaps to her geographic distance from the meeting hall, or some other landmark.

If, when between meetings, the board deems some action or decision necessary, and all the members are elsewhere outside the meeting hall, then either they are all absent, or none of them is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The correctness of this process notwithstanding, I'd have to say that I don't think the president can be absent barring a bylaw-level definition of that term, related perhaps to her geographic distance from the meeting hall, or some other landmark.

If, when between meetings, the board deems some action or decision necessary, and all the members are elsewhere outside the meeting hall, then either they are all absent, or none of them is.

Since the Bylaws provide that the Vice-President shall act in "the President's absence," that phrase obviously has some meaning, even if it is not clearly defined. It will be up to the organization to figure out what that meaning is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...