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When to Hold Runoff Elections


Guest Guest_Davis

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The scenario I have a question about is as follows:

- 6 candidates running for four board seats

- Voting by ballot, ballot to contain names of 4 of the candidates WITHOUT any indication of preference

- Number of voters = 145

- The first ballot results are:

Candidate A - 137 votes

Candidate B - 135 votes

Candidate C - 110 votes

Candidate D - 82 votes

Candidate E - 72 votes

Candidate F - 59 votes

Is the election over with candidates A, B, C and D declared the winners?

If not, why and what are the correct runoff procedures to follow?

Thanks

Davis

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Thanks Chris,

That is what I thought too, but the Parliamentarian felt otherwise. He insisted that only those candidates who

received more than the total number of votes from all those who had less than a majority (72+59 = 131) were elected

in the first ballot.

He then required a runoff of candidates C, D and E. Candidate F was dropped.

The final result of the second ballot gave the final two slots to candidates C and E! Candidate D, despite being 1 of 4

people running for 4 seats that had more than a majority in the 1st ballot, was NOT elected.

I am trying to find the justification for such a ruling. There were no IRV rules (or something such as) required by the

constitution nor were any adopted based on a vote of the assembly before the elections.

Did our Parliamentarian make an error here?

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I am trying to find the justification for such a ruling. There were no IRV rules (or something such as) required by the

constitution nor were any adopted based on a vote of the assembly before the elections.

Did our Parliamentarian make an error here?

Yes. See RONR pp. 424-430 for an explanation of the various forms of election - and I'll note that if your bylaws do not specifically authorize cumulative voting (where each member gets multiple votes), then the vote is entirely invalid since it violates a fundamental principle of parliamentary law.

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Yes. See RONR pp. 424-430 for an explanation of the various forms of election - and I'll note that if your bylaws do not specifically authorize cumulative voting (where each member gets multiple votes), then the vote is entirely invalid since it violates a fundamental principle of parliamentary law.

Cumulative voting was not mentioned in the original post. All the rules on page 429 under Cumulative Voting would need to be followed for it to be cumulative voting.

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The scenario I have a question about is as follows:

- 6 candidates running for four board seats

- Voting by ballot, ballot to contain names of 4 of the candidates WITHOUT any indication of preference

- Number of voters = 145

- The first ballot results are:

Candidate A - 137 votes

Candidate B - 135 votes

Candidate C - 110 votes

Candidate D - 82 votes

Candidate E - 72 votes

Candidate F - 59 votes

Is the election over with candidates A, B, C and D declared the winners?

If not, why and what are the correct runoff procedures to follow?

Thanks

Davis

Well, based upon this tellers' report it does appear that some of the 145 members voting must have voted for more than four candidates, which would indicate that something has gone wrong. :)

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- 6 candidates running for four board seats

- Voting by ballot, ballot to contain names of 4 of the candidates WITHOUT any indication of preference

- Number of voters = 145

- The first ballot results are:

Candidate A - 137 votes

Candidate B - 135 votes

Candidate C - 110 votes

Candidate D - 82 votes

Candidate E - 72 votes

Candidate F - 59 votes

Is the election over with candidates A, B, C and D declared the winners?

If not, why and what are the correct runoff procedures to follow?

Well, based upon this tellers' report it does appear that some of the 145 members voting must have voted for more than four candidates, which would indicate that something has gone wrong. :)

I've checked Mr. Honemann's math, and he's right. If 145 voters cast votes for up to four candidates, the maximum number of votes should be 580 (4 * 145). But the number of votes for the candidates adds up to 595 votes. Since this is greater than the margin by which Candidate D obtained a majority, this is a fairly serious problem.

Did you make a typo? And if not, have the ballots been securely preserved?

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But... you, Guest Davis, or whoever may be looking over the ballots (if available), cannot go changing the results on your own.

It will require a motion for a recount (p. 404) adopted by a majority at a meeting to recount the ballots and (maybe) overturn the election results. Or declare them invalid because of "too many" votes on some ballots.

Until that time - if it happens - the results as announced at the election meeting stand. And will definitely stand if the recount motion is not adopted. Or the ballots are gone.

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