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Guest William Sober Jr.

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Guest William Sober Jr.

Recently at one of the local City Council meetings, the topic about demolishing a home was brought before the Council. The entity in question bought an adjoining property for expansion of their business, and this house needed to be torn down to accomplish this. There was a lot of discussions, for and against. And when it came time to take the vote, it was told by the President that whether you are in favor of the demolishing or not, you must vote in favor of it.

How can this even be called a vote, if everyone must vote in favor?

Actually what is the point of even bringing it before the body, if again, it must be voted in favor?

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Recently at one of the local City Council meetings, the topic about demolishing a home was brought before the Council. The entity in question bought an adjoining property for expansion of their business, and this house needed to be torn down to accomplish this. There was a lot of discussions, for and against. And when it came time to take the vote, it was told by the President that whether you are in favor of the demolishing or not, you must vote in favor of it.

How can this even be called a vote, if everyone must vote in favor?

Actually what is the point of even bringing it before the body, if again, it must be voted in favor?

This procedure is not from Robert's Rules.

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Did anyone object to the President's comments? What the President said is not supported by RONR. The Council, assuming it allowed the President's order to stand could re-open the issue at the next meeting through a motion to Rescind Something Previously Adopted. It would require a second and a 2/3 vote or a majority of the entire membership unless notice was provided. The motion to rescind must be made when no one else has the floor and no motion is before the Council. See pages 305-310 for more information.

If the President refuses to allow the motion, make a Point of Order and make sure to have your copy of RONR ready. If the President refuses the Point of Order to proceed, then make an appeal citing the pages above from RONR as to why the motion is allowed.

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The Council, assuming it allowed the President's order to stand could re-open the issue at the next meeting through a motion to Rescind Something Previously Adopted. It would require a second and a 2/3 vote or a majority of the entire membership unless notice was provided. The motion to rescind must be made when no one else has the floor and no motion is before the Council. See pages 305-310 for more information.

Though they can only Rescind the part of the motion that hasn't been executed yet (RONR doesn't provide for a time machine to "undemolish" the house if it has already been demolished).

If the President refuses to allow the motion, make a Point of Order and make sure to have your copy of RONR ready. If the President refuses the Point of Order to proceed, then make an appeal citing the pages above from RONR as to why the motion is allowed.

I would also direct William to RONR pp. 650-651 regarding how a member can put the question regarding a Point of Order or Appeal that the President refuses to entertain.

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The Council, assuming it allowed the President's order to stand could re-open the issue at the next meeting through a motion to Rescind Something Previously Adopted.

This terminology is redundant. In the case of the motion to Amend Something Previously Adopted, the additional language is needed to differentiate it from the subsidiary motion to Amend. The motion to Rescind, however, is applied (by definition) to something which has been previously adopted, and so no further clarification is needed.

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