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coybur

What is the definition of write in?

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Our by laws do not mention "write-in's" for voting.

it does says a person can only be nominated for one postion,and can only hold one postion.

There is a question between nominated and running for an office and the definition of write in.

I was under the impression that write-in's were for open slots(no one nominated or running) and if a person was on the ballot for a postion already they would not be a write in for a second postion.

Please could anyone clarify this.

Thank You

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Not quite...

A write-in vote can be cast, by writing a name and, presumably, putting an "X", or check mark by the name, for anybody (if eligible) and any office, no matter whether there are already formal nominees for that office or none at all.

A write-in, among other things, is a way of telling the nominating committee that you don't like the candidate(s) they picked.

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Guest Edgar

A write-in vote can be cast, by writing a name and, presumably, putting an "X", or check mark by the name . . .

I think the writing of the name itself is sufficient to indicate the voter's intent. No additional mark is necessary.

A write-in, among other things, is a way of telling the nominating committee that you don't like the candidate(s) they picked.

Though you can do that more openly by making a nomination from the floor. Which would also make it more likely that others might vote for your candidate.

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Our by laws do not mention "write-in's" for voting.

Good. Most likely then they are allowed, as per RONR. I say "most likely" because some higher rule you may not be aware of might restrict them, but I'd say go for it. RONR says you can use them, and that may be good enough.

it does says a person can only be nominated for one postion,and can only hold one postion.

Well, that's fine, although if elections are held for all offices on one ballot, it is a little restrictive. But, they're your bylaws.

There is a question between nominated and running for an office and the definition of write in.

I was under the impression that write-in's were for open slots(no one nominated or running) and if a person was on the ballot for a postion already they would not be a write in for a second postion.

RONR doesn't really address "running for office", so you're kind-a on your own their. But we get what you mean. Still and all, being nominated for office is the first part of the process, followed by part two, the election itself. Your impression about write-in votes is off a bit. Write-ins can be offered for any position up for election, whether there are nominees are not. It's a mechanism by which voters may register their preference for someone who was not nominated, either by a nominating committee or from the floor (you do allow floor nominations, don't you?) before voting begins. Of course, if there are no nominees for an open position by the time ballots are passed out, then surely write-in votes are about all you have left to use.

As for being on the ballot already, that would mean they have been nominated previously. So, by your rules, they can't be nominated for another position. But write-in votes aren't nominations, they're votes cast during the election phase, and nothing in the rules you've cited would prevent you from writing in (i.e. voting for) John Smith for Treasurer (let's say there were no nominees for Treasurer) even though John was already nominated and on the ballot for Vice President. Should it turn out that John gets the majority of votes for both positions, then he would have to choose which one he will accept (assuming he's present), and you would need to reballot for the other position he declined. If John wasn't present, the assembly would vote on which position to give John, and then reballot for the other position.

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I agree, but think it is a good "belt and suspenders" approach to add the "X" mark to a name written in on a ballot.

It is always possible that there might be floor nominations for an office that the voter writes down as they are offered for reference, and doesn't like any of them, so writes-in yet another name. Hopefully that voter will have the good sense to either cross off his rejects, or mark his preferred candidate with an X or check, but just in case.....

I definitely agree that a single written-in name (with or without an "X" or check) should be considered a vote for that person. I just like to be really sure there is no confusion when voting is the issue.

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Guest Edgar

I just like to be really sure there is no confusion when voting is the issue.

I wouldn't be at all surprised to hear of an instance where an "X" next to a name (as opposed to, say, a check mark) was interpreted to mean that the voter was not voting for that person. Stranger tales have been told here.

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