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Missed the election of officers?


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Guest NHS Member

My high school held a meeting for National Honor Society but did not inform all the members of this meeting. There were no school announcements of the meeting. Membvers only knew about it from word-of-mouth and text messaging.

I, among other members, did not attend the meeting because I didn't know about it. I never got a text message.

I'm upset because they decided to hold elections for officers at that meeting.

Is it okay that they held an election without all members present? I asked ou advisor for a re-election and she told me I would have to ask the other members at the next meeting about that. Are they allowed to turn down the re-election and keep their current officers?

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It isn't proper to even have a meeting without notifying ALL the members.

The "notification", however, can be a scheduleing provision in the bylaws, or other rules, as long as it is specific, p. 89. In that case there is no requirement to send around any additional notification.

So raise a point of order, if appropriate, at the next meeting and have the election ruled null and void.

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Okay, so you're saying that they didn't have to announce the meeting, but there shouldn't have been a meeting unless all members were "notified" or in my case, texted? P. 89 of the nhs bylaws? I don't have access to our bylaws without the advisor password.

I need as many points to make as possible to back my point at our next meeting. Thanks!

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Is it okay that they held an election without all members present?

Oh sure, happens all the time. Where they failed miserably, as Dr Stackpole has noted, is by not notifying all members. That means all the business conducted is null and void, but it still requires someone (like you) to raise a Point of Order at the next properly called meeting (and Appealing the chair's ruling if necessary) to void the election.

And p.89 refers to RONR (Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised - 11th Ed.) the focus of this forum. If your bylaws are 89 pages long, or longer -- yikes! :)

Okay, so you're saying that they didn't have to announce the meeting, but there shouldn't have been a meeting unless all members were "notified" or in my case, texted? P. 89 of the nhs bylaws? I don't have access to our bylaws without the advisor password.

If the schedule of meetings is included in the bylaws (let's say "the first Thursday of each month from September to May"), then those meetings don't have to have a notice sent out, although it's a courtesy. This assumes all members have been given a copy of the bylaws so they know about that schedule. If the meeting was a special (called) meeting, then notice would be required as per the bylaws, assuming that the bylaws authorize special meetings and define the required notice.

So, some of the answer to your question involves the content of your bylaws, which we cannot interpret here for you so don't post them here. Can you tell us whether this meeting was a "regularly scheduled" meeting?

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. . . my son (who was in NHS and moves into his college freshman dorm in 2 hrs!!)

Congratulations! The burning question is: will he be armed with a copy of RONR? Multiple copies? In Brief too?

The local university opened last weekend with the usual arrival of whole families, SUVs, and U-Hauls. I remember going away to college on the bus with just a suitcase. Inexplicably, I left my copy of ROR (the 75th Anniversary Edition) at home,

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Guest_NHS_Member, I would suggest you get a hold of a copy of The Book:

http://www.robertsrules.com/book.html

and also a copy of the brief version of the Book:

http://www.robertsrules.com/inbrief.html

which is much, much, shorter. Read the brief version, commit it to memory, have the big version around to intimidate people with (and to research the 80% of the Rules that are used only 20% of the time), and get a hold of your bylaws. The bylaws probably state something about notification of meetings, and probably even scheduling of meetings. I would be surprised if they had a mention of texting as an approved method to announce a meeting, but I could be wrong.

Note: I just googled National Honor Society bylaws, and found some sample ones out there - there is at least one chapter that list Facebook messages as a method of notification. Anyone else feel old?

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Oh sure, happens all the time. Where they failed miserably, as Dr Stackpole has noted, is by not notifying all members. That means all the business conducted is null and void, but it still requires someone (like you) to raise a Point of Order at the next properly called meeting (and Appealing the chair's ruling if necessary) to void the election.

And p.89 refers to RONR (Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised - 11th Ed.) the focus of this forum. If your bylaws are 89 pages long, or longer -- yikes! :)

If the schedule of meetings is included in the bylaws (let's say "the first Thursday of each month from September to May"), then those meetings don't have to have a notice sent out, although it's a courtesy. This assumes all members have been given a copy of the bylaws so they know about that schedule. If the meeting was a special (called) meeting, then notice would be required as per the bylaws, assuming that the bylaws authorize special meetings and define the required notice.

So, some of the answer to your question involves the content of your bylaws, which we cannot interpret here for you so don't post them here. Can you tell us whether this meeting was a "regularly scheduled" meeting?

Even if elections of officers are to take place at a regular meeting, notice of the elections is supposed to be sent in the call of the meeting. However, if the bylaws specify when the elections are to take place (which they should), I suppose there is a valid argument that the lack of a separate meeting notice would not invalidate the elections.

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Even if elections of officers are to take place at a regular meeting, notice of the elections is supposed to be sent in the call of the meeting. However, if the bylaws specify when the elections are to take place (which they should), I suppose there is a valid argument that the lack of a separate meeting notice would not invalidate the elections.

Indeed, I neglectfully omitted the part of the bylaws that states that the second Tuesday in April shall be known as the Annual Meeting and shall be for the purpose of electing officers, and so on. I would think no additional notice would be required in this case, though it would surely be helpful. That assumes each member has received a copy of the bylaws, and is not restricted from reviewing them at all without an advisor's password, as seems to be the case here.

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