Jump to content
The Official RONR Q & A Forums

Minutes During Absence of Secretary


Guest Carol Ann

Recommended Posts

The Secretary was absent for a board meeting. The President asked a staff employee to record the minutes. Question 1: Is the staff employee who recorded the minutes considered "Secretary Pro Tem" (even though she was not "elected" by the board)? Question 2: Should the staff employee sign the minutes? Typically in our organization the secretary and president signs the minutes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1. I presume the appointment was approved by unanimous consent of the board (no objections). The president does not have the sole power to choose a secretary pro tem.

2. I think the regular secretary should sign if he or she is the one to present the minutes at the next meeting, but I can't find a rule which says so. Stay tuned for a better answer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1. I presume the appointment was approved by unanimous consent of the board (no objections). The president does not have the sole power to choose a secretary pro tem.

2. I think the regular secretary should sign if he or she is the one to present the minutes at the next meeting, but I can't find a rule which says so.

1. I think the person who took the minutes should still be considered the (de facto) secretary pro tem (however sloppy the selection process).

2. I think the person who prepares the minutes for submission should sign her work ("respectfully submitted"). The ("real") Secretary can initial the minutes as approved (assuming she's back to work).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forget about "respectfully submitted" -- p. 471, line 32.

Hmmm. I saw the italicized words "respectfully submitted" and never looked at the context. Anyway, I think the fact that they were once used suggests that the minutes are signed by whoever submits them for approval, even if it's not the (capital "S") Secretary (which was the point I was trying to make by quoting those words, even if out of context). But thanks for the reminder.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyway, I think the fact that they were once used suggests that the minutes are signed by whoever submits them for approval…

And yet, who is doing the submitting at the following meeting? It's the regular secretary (assuming no further absence). It seems to me that the secretary pro tem's duties end when the meeting ends and the notes are turned over.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And yet, who is doing the submitting at the following meeting? It's the regular secretary (assuming no further absence). It seems to me that the secretary pro tem's duties end when the meeting ends and the notes are turned over.

Perhaps. I think it was Mr. Goldsworthy who used to get in high dudgeon when someone (the Secretary) would suggest signing his name to someone else's (the secretary pro tem's) work. It seemed like a convincing argument to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I'm all for dodgin' the dudgeon!

Perhaps we can agree on this: if the secretary pro tem turns over her notes to the Secretary (who was absent but is not otherwise indisposed) and the Secretary turns those notes into formal minutes (since she is presumably more familiar with the society's customs), the Secretary should sign the draft. If, on the other hand, the secretary pro tem turns her own notes into her own draft of the minutes, she (the secretary pro tem) should sign the draft, even if she gives it to the Secretary for submission at the next meeting. Or, as a third alternative, I suppose the Secretary could re-write whatever the secretary pro tem gives her since, as you say, the secretary pro tem no longer holds that position while the Secretary is still the Secretary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And yet, who is doing the submitting at the following meeting? It's the regular secretary (assuming no further absence). It seems to me that the secretary pro tem's duties end when the meeting ends and the notes are turned over.

How about "when the meeting ends and the signed notes are turned over"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The President asked the staff member (the CEO's assistant) to record the minutes before the meeting started since the Secretary was absence. The President did not make a formal appointment request to the board regarding this. So, is this really considered a "Secretary Pro Tem" since it was not appointed by the board? The minutes are usually signed by the Secretary and President. Should we just have the President sign? or should the one who recorded the minutes also sign?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...