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President and Executive Board's Authority


Guest Anna

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[1] Can the president make a motion?

[2] Can members of the executive board make motions?

[3] How can the executive board take action to kill a motion they do not support?

1. If he's a member, sure. But see FAQ #1.

2. At a meeting of the executive board, sure. At a meeting of the general membership, if they're also general members, sure.

3. The board could adopt a motion to rescind a motion the board adopted but the board can't rescind a motion adopted by the general membership.

Remember that the board, as a board, plays no role at meetings of the general membership.

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3. The board could adopt a motion to rescind a motion the board adopted but the board can't rescind a motion adopted by the general membership.

I read that third question as if in the present/future tense. That is, a motion is on the floor now (or will be) and the board wants to kill it. But you may be right. Perhaps Guest_Anna can clarify for us: is this a motion that has been adopted already? Or are you asking for future reference so that at a future meeting if a motion is made and you decide after a while you want to just forget about it an move on, how do you do that?

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Can the president make a motion? Can members of the executive board make motions? How can the executive board take action to kill a motion they do not support?

In a meeting of the general membership, the general members can speak against pending motions, vote against them, and urge others to do the same. A general member being a board member does not give him any more or less power in a meeting of the general membership.

In a board meeting, the board can adopt a report recommending (against) certain action.

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In our organization, there is a president, an executive board, a council of representatives and a general membership. There are board meetings where the president and the executive board convene and then there are council meetings where the president, the executive board and the representatives meet. At times, there are general membership meetings where all parties attend.

The issue at hand is that a representative has made a main motion at a council meeting. The president did not follow Robert's Rules properly in handling it. None of the representatives is sure of the status of the motion. The motion was eventually discussed, but not by following Robert's Rules format closely or properly. Since the president moved on to other topics without closing the discussion or taking any other action with regard to the motion, there is confusion. The president and the board have made it clear they do not want either motion adopted. If they claim we use Robert's Rules, don't they have an obligation to block it by using proper motions in Robert's Rules? What would these motions most likely be and how can they be countered?

Is it proper to start out at the next meeting calling points of order? What would be a good way for representatives to move forward at the next council meeting? How can we work toward having the motion voted upon?

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In our organization, there is a president, an executive board, a council of representatives and a general membership. There are board meetings where the president and the executive board convene and then there are council meetings where the president, the executive board and the representatives meet. At times, there are general membership meetings where all parties attend.

The issue at hand is that a representative has made a main motion at a council meeting. The president did not follow Robert's Rules properly in handling it. None of the representatives is sure of the status of the motion. The motion was eventually discussed, but not by following Robert's Rules format closely or properly. Since the president moved on to other topics without closing the discussion or taking any other action with regard to the motion, there is confusion. The president and the board have made it clear they do not want either motion adopted. If they claim we use Robert's Rules, don't they have an obligation to block it by using proper motions in Robert's Rules? What would these motions most likely be and how can they be countered?

Is it proper to start out at the next meeting calling points of order? What would be a good way for representatives to move forward at the next council meeting? How can we work toward having the motion voted upon?

Make the motion at the next meeting and, if the chair attempts to "move on," raise a point of order that the chair puts the pending motion to a vote when there is no more debate.

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I made the motion at the last meeting and it was not acted upon. To clarify, you're suggesting I make it again? Is there a provision for me to call for an end to the discussion (as we were discussing it last meeting) and then call for it to be voted on?

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I made the motion at the last meeting and it was not acted upon. To clarify, you're suggesting I make it again? Is there a provision for me to call for an end to the discussion (as we were discussing it last meeting) and then call for it to be voted on?

It appears that he motion somehow improperly ceased to be the pending motion. Being that, I cannot guess which crack in procedure it fell through and where it landed. Therefore, I would suggest making the motion again and making sure that it is handled properly this time. Yes, sometimes members must take on the burden of helping the chair do his job.

If, on the other hand, there is clarity among the members that the motion was pending when the session adjourned, it will properly come up under the heading Unfinished Business at the next session, provided that the next session is held within a quarterly time interval and the standard order of business is followed.

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