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Unusual resignation problem


Guest Janice B.

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If a letter of resignation has been presented to a Board and read and no action,  discussed nor accepted or rejected has happened, would it still be considered that the person has resigned or must the matter be taken up at the next Board meeting?

Thank you.

Janice

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If a letter of resignation has been presented to a Board and read and no action,  discussed nor accepted or rejected has happened, would it still be considered that the person has resigned or must the matter be taken up at the next Board meeting?

Thank you.

Janice

 

A resignation from office?  Assuming the Board has the authority to accept it (RONR, pp. 467-468), the resignation needs to be acted on to be official but the member at this point would not be compelled to continue on with any of the duties of that office. (RONR, p. 291)

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She is a sewer clerk and resigned from her job. She presented the resignation letter and it was read but no action taken, affirmative or negative. They just went on to something else on the agenda. So, in other words, she would not be in that job then due to the handing in of her resignation letter? That would stand as official?

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She is a sewer clerk and resigned from her job. She presented the resignation letter and it was read but no action taken, affirmative or negative. They just went on to something else on the agenda. So, in other words, she would not be in that job then due to the handing in of her resignation letter? That would stand as official?

 

RONR's rules regarding resignations primarily apply to resigning from office or membership. In those cases, the resignation is not effective until accepted, however, once there has been an opportunity for it to be accepted, the officer or member no longer needs to perform his duties. The reason for this is that since the position is entirely voluntary, the society can't really force someone to continue serving. Therefore, the only reason to deny a resignation would be if the society wished to pursue disciplinary action and remove them from office or expel them from membership instead of letting them resign.

 

The rules for resigning from an actual job might vary, since there may be contracts and such involved. I think you're better off addressing your question to an attorney.

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