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combining proposals into 1 vote


Guest Jonathan

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Recently my organization accepted a motion from the floor to combine three separate amendment proposals into one vote, due to time constraints. The motion was accepted and voted on with 2/3 majority in favor. Motion passed and vote took place for all three proposals into one vote. The view passed with 2/3 majority. Is this proper procedure to accept the initial motion to combine 3 proposals into 1 vote? Or should have board members denied the motion?

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What would be wrong with it, even by a majority vote?  (If the objection is the valid one that it is unacceptable to consider more than one main question at a time, the reply is that when the three amendments are combined, the combination is that one question.  Robert's Rules talks more about the other way around -- when the original proposal has more than one aspect, and it is desired to pull it apart like a baked chicken.)

 

Oh, and if it's a board meeting, then the last question makes sense, but if, as it seems, this was a meeting of the general membership, the board has no business doing anything at all:  it would be up to the presiding officer only, who might not be a board member at all (although, yes, commonly is), to decide if any particular motion is out of order.

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What would be wrong with it, even by a majority vote?  (If the objection is the valid one that it is unacceptable to consider more than one main question at a time, the reply is that when the three amendments are combined, the combination is that one question.  Robert's Rules talks more about the other way around -- when the original proposal has more than one aspect, and it is desired to pull it apart like a baked chicken.)

 

Oh, and if it's a board meeting, then the last question makes sense, but if, as it seems, this was a meeting of the general membership, the board has no business doing anything at all:  it would be up to the presiding officer only, who might not be a board member at all (although, yes, commonly is), to decide if any particular motion is out of order.

 

If these are three independent amendment proposals, unanimous consent is required in order to combine them into one (and although the presiding officer makes the initial ruling as to whether or not a motion is in order, the assembly itself is the final decision maker).

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(I had first written "squawking," then changed it to "baked" to allow for more refined, not to say prissy, sensibilities than my own, and here's the thanks I get.)

 

Why unanimous consent, if you please?

 

If presented in one motion they must be separated for individual consideration and vote upon the demand of a single member (RONR, 11th ed., pp. 274-75), and so a single objection would prevent separate, independent proposals from being combined into one for consideration and vote.

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If presented in one motion they must be separated for individual consideration and vote upon the demand of a single member (RONR, 11th ed., pp. 274-75), and so a single objection would prevent separate, independent proposals from being combined into one for consideration and vote.

Say the Chair gets unanimous consent to consider all of them at once and then a member enters the room who wants one (or more) of the proposals considered separately.  Would it be too late for him to demand the separation?

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Say the Chair gets unanimous consent to consider all of them at once and then a member enters the room who wants one (or more) of the proposals considered separately.  Would it be too late for him to demand the separation?

 

That's an interesting question, but no, I don't think it would be too late for him to demand the separation.

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Once the three amendments are combined into one vote, would it not take a majority vote on a division to separate the amendments and have three votes.

 

Of course, a long resolution could have been made to deal with all three amendments at the same time.  For example, "Resolved, that the By-laws be amended as follows: to change By-law #1 to change the number of directors from 5 to 7; to change By-law #3 to change the date of Board meetings from the second Monday of each month to the third Monday of each month; and to change By-law #4 to create the office of 2nd Vice President."

 

Of course if all three amendments are discussed at the same time, could a ballot vote not be taken with a yes or no option for each amendment.  Thus, only one vote, but still dealing with all three amendments at the same time.

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Of course if all three amendments are discussed at the same time, could a ballot vote not be taken with a yes or no option for each amendment.  Thus, only one vote, but still dealing with all three amendments at the same time.

 

One ballot is not (necessarily) the same thing as one vote.

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It depends on whether the amendments deal with independent subjects.

 

In the Rev's example, would you say that 1 & 2 ('cardinality' of the board, its meeting time) are not independent, but 3 (creating a new office) is?

 

I'm here to learn, but if "member Dunn's book" is the common subject of congratulating him about it, and a club library purchase (p 273), seems to me--correction welcome--that "the Board of Directors" plays that role for 1 and 2. Or ...?

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In the Rev's example, would you say that 1 & 2 ('cardinality' of the board, its meeting time) are not independent, but 3 (creating a new office) is?

 

 

The question as to what are and what are not independent motions is not the subject of this thread. If you want to post a question along those lines, post a new Topic in this General Discussion Forum.

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