Jump to content
The Official RONR Q & A Forums

Quorum Defined


Guest Hollie Guillory

Recommended Posts

if you need 6 boards members to make a quorum to start a meeting and then board members drop below the quorum, can the meeting legally continue (with full voting rights).

 

Take a look at FAQ #3 Is it true that, once a quorum has been established, it continues to exist no matter how many members leave during the course of the meeting?.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the quorum of the membership is not present at the meeting, would the meeting still be able to go on, with the following business being conducted:

 

Discussion and/or announcements on Unfinished and New Business and reports of the standing committees?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the quorum of the membership is not present at the meeting, would the meeting still be able to go on, with the following business being conducted:

 

Discussion and/or announcements on Unfinished and New Business and reports of the standing committees?

 

No substantive business may be conducted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Discussion and/or announcements on Unfinished and New Business and reports of the standing committees?

 

No. The chair can't state the question on any motions (except for a few procedural motions) and reports can't be given. I suppose you could Recess in order to sit around and talk aimlessly.

 

I am assuming reports could be given, but nothing new would be able to be addressed.  Would the reports read have to be reread at the next membership meeting where a quorum would hopefully be present?

 

Reports cannot be formally received without a quorum. So yes, if a quorum is not present and a report is given, the report would also need to be read at the next meeting with a quorum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Josh, could you further assist us with regard to this issue?

 

Our membership consists of active members (who vote), associate members (who vote on only limited issues) and honorary members (life members who no longer pay association dues or vote).

 

In order to meet the definition of a quorum, the attendees of the meeting would just have to be members or the organization, not necessarily voting members ... correct?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A quorum is the "minimum number of members who must be present at the meetings of a deliberatively assembly for business to be validly transacted..." (RONR 11, p 21 ll. 3-5)

 

A member of an assembly is "a person entitled to full participation in its proceedings... (including the right) ... to vote." (RONR 11, p. 3 ll. 1-5)

 

Honorary members (who can not vote) would not count towards the quorum.  How the associate members (who can vote only on limited issues) apply to determining the quorum is a little questionable.  Stay tuned.........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our membership consists of active members (who vote), associate members (who vote on only limited issues) and honorary members (life members who no longer pay association dues or vote).

 

In order to meet the definition of a quorum, the attendees of the meeting would just have to be members or the organization, not necessarily voting members ... correct?

 

So far as RONR is concerned, all members are voting members. RONR does discuss the concept of honorary membership, but it describes this as a complementary title rather than true membership. Based on the facts provided, I do not think they would count as "members" for the purposes of determining if a quorum is present.

 

The concept of members who only have the right to vote on certain issues is not discussed in RONR and is new to me. The society will have to interpret its own bylaws for that one. See RONR, 11th ed., pgs. 588-591 for some Principles of Interpretation. In the long run, it would probably be advisable to amend the bylaws to clarify this issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...