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approving and taping minutes


zanacakes

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I am the secretary and would like to know if it appropriate to tape record minutes at a meeting following Robert's Rules of Order?   I was informed by the treasurer that I should tape the meetings because we are preparing for our first audit and the accountants might want to see the minutes. Also, the chairman claimed I missed a question asked by someone.  If I record the minutes then I will have back up to the written minutes.   

 

We have monthly meetings and the minutes from the last 2 meetings have not been approved as per the chairman. He said he needs to speak with me about vetting the content of the minutes before he releases the minutes to the assembly for approval.  How much time should lapse if you have monthly meeting before the minutes should be approved?

 

When minutes are corrected, how much correction is allowed before the content is changed so not to be a true representation of the meeting.  Basically I have written some things that were said that make some of the individuals who made the comments look unfavorable.   Our Constitution states the Secretary shall enter accurate minutes of the meeting of the BOT in a ledger for that purpose

 

 

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You are clearly recording way too much in your minutes.  Minutes are a record of what was done, at a meeting, not what was said.  You should record motions, and their disposition, but not who said what, who asked what questions, and so on.

 

If you think you need to record every word, you are probably overdoing it.   Recording can help you to cross check the exact wording of motions as stated by the chair, but none of the debate or discussion belongs in the minutes anyway.

 

Also, the chairman has no authority to review or amend the draft minutes.  The assembly itself is authorized to make corrections to the draft minutes, not any one person.

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The first paragraph of the minutes should include the kind of meeting, the name of the society, the date and time of the meeting (and place if it is not always the same), who is presiding and serving as secretary, and whether the minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. The body of the minutes should contain the exact wording of main motions along with their disposition, secondary motions that are not lost or withdrawn, the complete substance of oral reports given by committee, all notices of motions, and all points of order and appeals. The last paragraph should state the hour of adjournment. (page 468 ff.)

 

You will notice that debate and questions are not included in that list. While a recording can be helpful in preparing the minutes, if you are trying to include everything that was said, you're making your life too difficult. Including that stuff also makes an auditor's job more difficult.

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