Jump to content
The Official RONR Q & A Forums

Speaking on behalf of an absent board member


Guest janet

Recommended Posts

At a recent School Board meeting, they were discussing a motion. One member was absent and another member stated how the absent member stood on the particular matter being discussed. Is this allowed? I feel like the absent member should have sent an email to members directly stating their position on the topic. No board member should be allowed to speak on another's behelaf because it could influence the vote and there is no way to verify the accuracy of the opinions of the absent member.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing in RONR requires a member to limit his comments to his own original thoughts.

 

No, but it's going to take a careful orator for it to stay within the bounds of the purpose of debate, and use of member's names, etc.  If presiding, I'm confident the remarks would quickly get to a point where I'd have to rule they're improper.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No board member should be allowed to speak on another's behelaf because it could influence the vote and there is no way to verify the accuracy of the opinions of the absent member.

 

As the others have stated, nothing in RONR makes that the rule. Of course it could influence the vote. There wouldn't be much point in stating the absent member's opinion if it couldn't. As for verifying the accuracy, when hearsay involved, people judge the accuracy by how much they trust the person who is stating the opinion of the other person.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quoting Shakespeare or Thomas Jefferson is one thing...but claiming to be speaking on behalf on an elected official is another. In this case, it was not a close vote, but misquoting someone could swing a vote in a more controversial debate.

 

The public should know how their elected members feel on an issue and they should not hear it thru a third party claiming to speak on their behalf.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that if elected officials are voting based on what they believe other elected officials think is right, then they're basing their opinion on the wrong thing. However, if someone mentions a conversation they had with an elected official and that conversation persuaded them to vote a certain way, then the others may benefit from hearing the topic of that conversation because they might be persuaded by the same thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...