Jump to content
The Official RONR Q & A Forums

minutes


Guest chelle

Recommended Posts

A session in which what is said and done during the meeting cannot be disclosed to people outside of the meeting.

 

Well, it can't be disclosed to non-members of the body that met in executive session. It can be disclosed to members who weren't present (who were, in other words, "outside the meeting").

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Want to make sure I have my facts straight....

 

Scenario - So if a meeting is called and all board members (who represent individual districts/memberships) are invited.

The meeting starts off, items are discussed and then goes "in camera".

 

-During the "in camera" part, you can't write anything down or discuss outside of that period of time.

- The items that are mentioned in the minutes (outside of the incamera session) are okay to discuss with the membership?  Minutes have not yet been approved as that would have to wait for next meeting later in the year,

- The items mentioned can be adopted if the motion passed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The board can do anything while meeting in executive session that it can do while meeting in so-called "open session". In other words, motions may be made, debated, and voted on. Minutes are kept.

 

Once those minutes are approved (i.e. once they become the minutes), the general membership could order them read (as it can any board minutes) at a meeting of the general membership (which would also be held in executive session).

 

But note that minutes only record what was done (e.g. motions), not what was said (e.g. debate) so access to the minutes alone would not disclose the nature of the debate. That would remain confidential per the rules governing executive session.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The board can do anything while meeting in executive session that it can do while meeting in so-called "open session". In other words, motions may be made, debated, and voted on. Minutes are kept.

 

Once those minutes are approved (i.e. once they become the minutes), the general membership could order them read (as it can any board minutes) at a meeting of the general membership (which would also be held in executive session).

 

But note that minutes only record what was done (e.g. motions), not what was said (e.g. debate) so access to the minutes alone would not disclose the nature of the debate. That would remain confidential per the rules governing executive session.

so can the information from the "open session" be discussed with the membership prior to the minutes being approved?  The problem is..... as a director, we represent a district of members and the exec have done some questionable stuff to their advantage?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 . . .  so can the information from the "open session" be discussed with the membership prior to the minutes being approved? 

 

Yes. Though the fact that the minutes haven't been approved is irrelevant. The approved minutes are (just?) the official record of what was done at the meeting.

 

So the morning after the meeting Board Member Jane could tell General Member Joe (her husband?) that the board (in open session) discussed painting the clubhouse and decided to paint it red. She could not tell him that, while the board was meeting in executive session, there was a heated argument over who to hire to do the painting and how much to pay him.

 

(Boards frequently meet in executive session when debating and deciding on particularly sensitive, and personal, questions such as hiring and firing and salaries.)

 

Now it might turn out that Jane misunderstood the motion that was adopted and, when the minutes come up for approval at the next meeting, it will turn out that the motion was actually to paint the clubhouse blue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... -During the "in camera" part, you can't write anything down or discuss outside of that period of time....

 

Well, no, there's no prohibition on writing stuff down.  The same as there's no prohibition on hearing what goes on, and remembering it.  It's just that you can't share your notes with anyone who wouldn't have been allowed into the confidential part of the meeting ("executive session") -- the same as you can't tell anyone who wouldn't have been allowed there what you heard, either.  

 

... - The items mentioned can be adopted if the motion passed.

 

Chelle, what do you mean by this?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, no, there's no prohibition on writing stuff down.  The same as there's no prohibition on hearing what goes on, and remembering it.  It's just that you can't share your notes with anyone who wouldn't have been allowed into the confidential part of the meeting ("executive session") -- the same as you can't tell anyone who wouldn't have been allowed there what you heard, either.  

 

 

Chelle, what do you mean by this?

Just wanted to make sure that if a motion is passed, then the items mentioned in the motion are adopted and can  be actioned immediately?  There is always a question of "code of conduct" with our board if anything is said out side of the meeting before the minutes have been approved.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless the motion has a "delay doing this until..." provision built in, whatever it says to do should be done right away, or as "right away" as is possible or convenient.  None of the Supreme Court's "All deliberate speed" tomfoolery.  You do NOT, nay, SHOULD NOT wait until minutes are approved.

 

I don't understand your second sentence.  (Doesn't sound like a parliamentary concern anyway.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is always a question of "code of conduct" with our board if anything is said out side of the meeting before the minutes have been approved.....

 

The fact that the minutes haven't (or have) been approved has absolutely no bearing on whether a board member can discuss (with non-board members) what took place at the board meeting.

 

(And "actioned" is still not a word.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chelle, if you have a copy of RONR, or if you don't, if you ever get to look at one, take a look at the example of how motions are handled on p. 120 - 121.  In this example, the organization is considering making a donation to some function.  So the assembly deliberates on it, and then votes.  The vote is in favor, so the chair announces that the motion is carried; then he immediately directs the treasurer to write the check, and the secretary to write a cover letter and mail the contribution.  I mean right away (and so does RONR).  The contribution does not wait until the minutes are approved next month.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...