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Guest Charles Reynolds

Conflict of interest vote

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Guest Charles Reynolds

I am working on writing a Conflict of Interest policy for our non-profit. But I have a quick question I cannot find an answer for.

 

If there is a possible conflict of interest among one of three board members and a vote is called, how would a possible tie be handled? (One board member is the person with the possible conflict, one member for for and another against, thus resulting in a tie.)

 

Any help would be appreciated.

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RONR doe not remove the right to vote for a "conflict of interest" - as defined, in different words, on p. 407.

 

So I guess you are on your own....

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That's easy.

A tie, by definition, represents a DEFEAT, where a majority vote is the necessary threshold of adoption.

 

No need to change anything

A tie of 66 to 66 is a defeat for a motion neeeding a majority vote.

A tie of 6 to 6 is a defeat.

A tie of 1 to 1 is a defeat.

 

Tip:

If you are amending your bylaws, then consider increasing the number of board members.

A tie of 2 to 2 is a defeat.

But you have doubled your chances of avoiding a 1 to 1 tie.

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Kim is correct about a tie on a proposal - it is a defeat.  But in an election a tie does not resolve anything - you have to keep trying until somebody wins.

 

Perhaps your conflict statement could be worded to NOT apply to elections.  Then (except for an abstention) you will be (more or less) assured of completing the election by a 2-1 (or 3-0) vote.

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If there is a possible conflict of interest among one of three board members and a vote is called, how would a possible tie be handled? (One board member is the person with the possible conflict, one member for for and another against, thus resulting in a tie.)

 

 

Ties can occur with any number of people on a board, because members always have the option of abstaining.  Ties are handled the same way in any case:  Because a tie vote is less than a majority, the chair simply announces that the motion was defeated, and moves on to the next item of business.  (In the case of an election, the chair announces that no one was elected on that ballot, and moves on to a second or subsequent ballot.)

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Guest Charles Reynolds

Thank you all for your input - even Edgar, because although not a masochist, I do have trouble saying "no" - I knew there was a reason there was no mention in the policy samples I found but could not place my finger on it.

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Guest Charles Reynolds

Thank you all for your input - even Edgar, because although not a masochist, I do have trouble saying "no" - I knew there was a reason there was no mention in the policy samples I found but could not place my finger on it.

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Thank you all for your input - even Edgar, because although not a masochist, I do have trouble saying "no" - I knew there was a reason there was no mention in the policy samples I found but could not place my finger on it.

 

 

Thank you all for your input - even Edgar, because although not a masochist, I do have trouble saying "no" - I knew there was a reason there was no mention in the policy samples I found but could not place my finger on it.

 

You're welcome.

 

And, you're welcome.

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