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Generally speaking, a general order is an item of business postponed from the previous meeting or from earlier in the meeting.

How does this differ from an on going list of Tabled Items that have a general timeline of when they will be completed such as Spring 2015 (due to weather conditions). Or is a general order something that would have been dealt with at a previous meeting but time ran out to discuss the matter so it was not dealt with at all.

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How does this differ from an on going list of Tabled Items that have a general timeline of when they will be completed such as Spring 2015 (due to weather conditions).

What you describe doesn't sound proper at all. Such motions will most likely be introduced as New Business when they are actually ready.

Or is a general order something that would have been dealt with at a previous meeting but time ran out to discuss the matter so it was not dealt with at all.

No, that would be Unfinished Business. As noted, the most common general orders are motions which are postponed. So if a motion was pending and the assembly agreed to postpone it until the next meeting, it would be a general order (unless the assembly voted to make it a special order, which is another subject).

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What you describe doesn't sound proper at all. Such motions will most likely be introduced as New Business when they are actually ready.

No, that would be Unfinished Business. As noted, the most common general orders are motions which are postponed. So if a motion was pending and the assembly agreed to postpone it until the next meeting, it would be a general order (unless the assembly voted to make it a special order, which is another subject).

So general orders refer only to motions that were postponed and not an item of business as Mr. Huynh stated above. Please clarify.

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So general orders refer only to motions that were postponed and not an item of business as Mr. Huynh stated above. Please clarify.

 

A postponed motion is an item of business (though there are items of business that aren't postponed motions).

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So general orders refer only to motions that were postponed and not an item of business as Mr. Huynh stated above. Please clarify.

 

No, general orders do not refer only to motions that were postponed, although that is probably the most common form of general order. Most items of business are motions, but I suppose there are others (reports come to mind). There are also other ways to make something a general order.

 

If we really want a thorough explanation of what a general order is, it's going to be necessary to start with the concept of an "order of the day."

 

"An order of the day, as stated above, is a particular subject, question, or item of business that is set in advance to be taken up during a given session, day, or meeting, or at a given hour, provided that no business having precedence over it interferes." (RONR, 11th ed., pg. 364)

 

An item of business might be made an order of the day by postponing it, by including it on an agenda, or by adopting a motion to make the item of business an order of the day. This category is then broken into general orders and special orders. If a motion is postponed or if a motion is adopted to make an item of business an order of the day, it is presumed to be a general order unless otherwise stated. If it is included on the agenda, it is presumed to be a special order if a specific time is associated with it, unless the agenda notes that the times are merely a guideline. In that case, or if no time is listed, it is assumed to be a general order.

 

The short version about the difference between the two is that a special order has a higher priority in the order of business and that if a special order is set for a particular time, it interrupts other business pending at that time. A general order has lower priority in the order of business and does not interrupt pending business.

 

As to what the items you mention are, I still don't have the slightest idea, since I'm still quite unclear on the facts of how they are introduced in the first place, whether a motion is involved, and how it is that they are delayed until a later time. (You have explained the why for the last part, but not the how.)

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