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How Lenient Can the Script for Handling a Motion Be

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I was looking at the collection of scrips for handling different motions at http://nancysylvester.com/docs/Resources/parliamentary_procedure_scripts.html. In order to follow strict RONR, do motions have to be said exactly as the script outlines or is there gray area?

 

For example, after a member has seconded a motion, is it OK to say "It has been moved and seconded" vs "It is moved and Seconded". The script also uses the term "discussion" whereas other scripts use the term "debate". Is either correct?

 

Is it acceptable to say "Those opposed say Nay" vs "Those opposed say no"?

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"The president should never be technical or more strict than is necessary for the good of the meeting. Good judgment is essential; the assembly may be of such a nature, through its unfamiliarity with parliamentary usage and its peaceable disposition, that strict enforcement of the rules, instead of assisting, would greatly hinder business. But in large assemblies where there is much work to be done, and especially where there is likelihood of trouble, the only safe course is to require a strict observance of the rules." (RONR 11th ed., p. 456, ll. 13-21)

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If you are to be the presiding officer at meetings, it's a good idea to get yourself a copy of Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised In Brief and read it as soon as possible, paying particular attention to what is said on pages 136-41.

 

Edited to add: Consistent use of proper wording by a presiding officer is far more important than one might think.

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I am actually going to be presiding officer at a mock meeting for a parliamentary procedure competition where we are graded strictly on performance with Robert's Rules. I want to make sure my wording follows Robert's Rules, but I realize there is not an exact wording for every situation like the ones above.

 

Would all of those word choices be equally correct?

 

p.s. I am going to order a Robert's Rules Book

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If you are competing in a parliamentary procedure contest, I would recomend following the RONR wording as closely as possible. The judges may or may not grade you down if you don't use the exact wording, but they certainly won't grade you down if you do.

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RONR has the following wording:

 

"It is moved and seconded..." (p. 37, l. 29)

 

"Are you ready for the question?" (or, less formally, "Is there any debate?") (p. 37, l. 34 to p. 38, l. 1)

 

"Those opposed, say no." (p. 45, ll. 33-34)

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