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Guest Susie Scott

Accept a motion

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Guest Susie Scott

If a member rises and states a motion - kind of out of the clear blue - must the President accept the motion before she asks for a second?

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If the motion is in order at the time (which might be a simple question, or a complicated one -- details would help), then yes, unless the president (whom I presume is presiding at the time) deems the motion out of order, in which case he or she announces his (&c) ruling on the question, stating his reasons, and that goes in the minutes.
(I think that's it:  it's two in the morning, my time, and probably everyone else's here in this time zone.)

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40 minutes ago, Guest Susie Scott said:

If a member rises and states a motion - kind of out of the clear blue -

must the President accept the motion before she asks for a second?

In general, "yes." -- If the motion is not of order, then "no".

A chair does not "accept" the motion, as that is not parliamentarily accurate, but a chair must "rule" if a motion is not in order.

A chair cannot suppress a motion, unless the motion is not in order.

***

There are dozens of motions which would be in order at any given time. -- "Out of the blue".

Here are some possibilities:

• Point of order

• Question of privilege

• Limit debate

• Parliamentary inquiry

• Suspend the rules

In Robert's Rules of Order, see "incidental main motions" for "how" and "why".

***

Q. So, in your case, was the motion in order, or not?

 

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5 hours ago, Kim Goldsworthy said:

In general, "yes." -- If the motion is not of order, then "no".

A chair does not "accept" the motion, as that is not parliamentarily accurate, but a chair must "rule" if a motion is not in order.

A chair cannot suppress a motion, unless the motion is not in order.

***

There are dozens of motions which would be in order at any given time. -- "Out of the blue".

Here are some possibilities:

• Point of order

• Question of privilege

• Limit debate

• Parliamentary inquiry

• Suspend the rules

In Robert's Rules of Order, see "incidental main motions" for "how" and "why".

***

Q. So, in your case, was the motion in order, or not?

 

I must admit to being completely baffled by this suggestion that guest Susie Scott (or anyone else) should see "incidental main motions" in Robert's Rules of Order for "how" and "why" motions such as the ones listed would be in order at any given time.

I suppose the point is that these are examples of parliamentary motions that may be made as main motions when no question is pending (interpreting "out of the clear blue" as meaning a time when no question is pending), but this doesn't amount to anything other than saying that main motions can be made when no other motion is pending (assuming they are in order). 

Edited by Daniel H. Honemann

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