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Executive Board Meeting Recording


Guest AmesAway
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During the E-board meeting, our secretary takes an audio recording, which she later uses to write the meeting notes. My question is this, our E-board meeting notes are not generally shared with the remaining membership. Is it appropriate that the secretary play the audio or share the minutes with someone who is not on e-board? This is the second time that our secretary, to my knowledge, has done this and I'm trying to get clarification as to whether she should be or not. Thanks!

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No, she should not.  The Board's minutes belong to the Board and it is up to the Board (majority vote) to decide if they should be shared.  The audio belongs only to the secretary and should best be destroyed after the official minutes are written and approved by the Board.  The recording is NOT the "minutes"  --  see page 471, line 26ff.

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Where can I find that the Board's minutes belong to the board and that a majority vote should decide if they are shared?

In regards to the audio being destroyed, the audio is being shared prior to the minutes being written. It is also my understanding that the minutes should reflect what was done, not what every specific person said. Where can I find that? I'm sorry, I'm relatively knew to all of this and I believe we have a secretary doing as she pleases. I need to make sure I have all the appropriate documentation to move forward with the complaints of mishandling.

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23 minutes ago, jstackpo said:

No, she should not.  The Board's minutes belong to the Board and it is up to the Board (majority vote) to decide if they should be shared.  The audio belongs only to the secretary and should best be destroyed after the official minutes are written and approved by the Board.  The recording is NOT the "minutes"  --  see page 471, line 26ff.

I don't believe the answer is quite as clear-cut as Dr Stackpole suggested. He might well be completely right, but think the answer depends on some facts we don't know. 

For example, are the executive board meetings truly in executive session? If they are, then the Secretary absolutely should not be sharing what was said and done at the meeting with anyone not on the board. 

However, if the meetings are not truly in executive session, I don't think the Secretary is violating any rule in RONR . Letting non  board members hear the recording might be unseemly and unprofessional, but we don't know enough to know if it violates any rule.

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8 minutes ago, Richard Brown said:

I don't believe the answer is quite as clear-cut as Dr Stackpole suggested. He might well be completely right, but think the answer depends on some facts we don't know. 

For example, are the executive board meetings truly in executive session? If they are, then the Secretary absolutely should not be sharing what was said and done at the meeting with anyone not on the board. 

However, if the meetings are not truly in executive session, I don't think the Secretary is violating any rule in RONR . Letting non  board members hear the recording might be unseemly and unprofessional, but we don't know enough to know if it violates any rule.

What satisfies as "executive session"? We have monthly meetings set up for the e board members.

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I guess that is a problem. Our meetings are open. The e-board is there and discusses business, makes motions and votes when necessary. Other people, who are union members are allowed to come, if they choose, and survey. They do not have a voice and cannot make motions or vote. With that being said, then I guess the secretary can share the meeting notes/audio with who she sees fit, without the board's prior approval (page 487)? 

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Guest Who's Coming to Dinner

In that case, I see no violation if the secretary plays the audio recording for union members. Rather than focus on default rules, you should adopt a standing rule that lays out what the secretary may and may not do with the recording.

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