Jump to content
The Official RONR Q & A Forums

who owns the motion


GuestDave
 Share

Recommended Posts

A member made a motion.  The motion was seconded.  The chair stated the motion to the assembly.  The author was called out of the meeting during some discussion.  An amendment was made to insert some additional language.  The amendment was seconded.  The chair stated the amendment to the assembly.  During discussion of the amendment someone stated the amendment was out of order because the author of the motion had to agree to the amendment, and the author wasn't present to agree.  I think the assembly owned the motion at this point and the author had no control over it, other than to argue for or against it like any other member of the assembly.  Who is right?  Thank you for your insights.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, SaintCad said:

One the question is stated, the motion belongs to the assembly and the maker of the motion does not have veto power over the amendment.

Thank you.  I agree.  Can you quote a rule or portion thereof that clearly states this?  I'd like to put this item to rest before it gets spread around, or becomes believed to be true by more members.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, GuestDave said:

Thank you.  I agree.  Can you quote a rule or portion thereof that clearly states this?  I'd like to put this item to rest before it gets spread around, or becomes believed to be true by more members.

"Regardless of whether or not the maker of the main motion "accepts" the amendment, it must be opened to debate and voted on formally (unless adopted by unanimous consent) and is handled under the same rules as amendments generally" (RONR, 11th ed., pg. 162).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, GuestDave said:

Thank you.  I agree.  Can you quote a rule or portion thereof that clearly states this?  I'd like to put this item to rest before it gets spread around, or becomes believed to be true by more members.

 

22 minutes ago, Josh Martin said:

"Regardless of whether or not the maker of the main motion "accepts" the amendment, it must be opened to debate and voted on formally (unless adopted by unanimous consent) and is handled under the same rules as amendments generally" (RONR, 11th ed., pg. 162).

Also, "After the question has been stated by the chair—although the assembly, and not the maker of the motion, then has control over its wording—the maker can request unanimous consent to modify the motion (see pp. 295–98). If any member then objects, however, the desired modification must be introduced in the form of a motion to Amend, as noted below. (RONR, 11th ed., pg. 114).  (Emphasis added).

And this on page 32:  "Neither the making nor the seconding of a motion places it before the assembly; only the chair can do that, by the third step (stating the question). When the chair has stated the question, the motion is pending, that is, "on the floor." It is then open to debate (if it is a main motion or one of several other debatable parliamentary motions, which are described in later chapters)."

And this on page 40:  "Until the chair states the question, the maker has the right to modify his motion as he pleases or to withdraw it entirely. After the question has been stated by the chair, the motion becomes the property of the assembly, and then its maker can do neither of these things without the assembly's consent (see pp. 295–98); but while the motion is pending the assembly can change the wording of the motion by the process of amendment (12) before acting upon it."  (Emphasis added).

See also FAQ No. 8:  http://www.robertsrules.com/faq.html#8

 

Edited by Richard Brown
Added last paragraph, link to FAQ # 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...