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rules surrounding conceding your time to another member?

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Guest Kim

What are the Robert's Rules of Order surrounding conceding your time to another member?

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6 minutes ago, Guest Kim said:

What are the Robert's Rules of Order surrounding conceding your time to another member?

You many not give any of your allotted time to speak to another member. RONR (11th ed.), p. 388

Edited by George Mervosh
Added citation.

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On 3/15/2019 at 2:34 PM, George Mervosh said:

You many not give any of your allotted time to speak to another member. RONR (11th ed.), p. 388

 

On 3/15/2019 at 3:17 PM, Gary Novosielski said:

It is not allowed at all.

Actually, a member who has the floor in debate is allowed to yield for a question (RONR, 11th ed., p. 295):

If information is desired of a member who is speaking, the inquirer, upon rising, may use the following form instead: 
MEMBER A: Madam President, will the member yield for a question? 
Or: 
MEMBER A: Mr. President, I would like to ask the gentleman [or "the member"] a question. 
If the speaker consents to the interruption, the time consumed will be taken out of his allowed time. The chair therefore asks if the speaker is willing to be interrupted, and if he consents, directs the inquirer to proceed. Although the presiding officer generally remains silent during the ensuing exchange, the inquiry, the reply, and any resulting colloquy are made in the third person through the chair. To protect decorum, members are not allowed to carry on discussion directly with one another. 
An inquiry of this kind may also be for the purpose of reminding a speaker of a point to be made in argument, or it may be intended to rebut his position; but it must always be put in the form of a question. 

This is mentioned again in the section on debate that Mr. Mervosh cited (p. 388; footnote omitted):

Rights in regard to debate are not transferable. Unless the organization has a special rule on the subject, a member cannot yield any unexpired portion of his time to another member, or reserve any portion of his time for a later time—that is, if a member yields the floor before speaking his full ten minutes, he is presumed to have waived his right to the remaining time.* If a speaker yields to another member for a question (Request for Information, pp. 294–95), the time consumed by the question is charged to the speaker. 

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Guest Zev

Perhaps the OP has been watching the proceedings of the US House of Representatives where such things are done on a routine basis. But that is only because the rules of the House allow it.

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