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Ad Hoc Committee Decision


Guest Susie
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 When an ad hoc committee brings a recommendation for approval to the Board and it is defeated, what happens next.  Is the Ad hoc committee automatically dissolved?   The matter cannot be reconsidered for 6 months according to the Bylaws.  What are the formal next steps required of the Board if a decision needs to be made.  

 

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Guest Who's Coming to Dinner

If the charge of the committee was to make a recommendation, it ceases to exist after the recommendation is received. Normally, the board is free to consider some alternate course proposed by a main motion, or to amend the existing motion if it was referred to the committee. I have no idea what your bylaws mean from that brief paraphrase.

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21 hours ago, Guest Susie said:

 When an ad hoc committee brings a recommendation for approval to the Board and it is defeated, what happens next.  Is the Ad hoc committee automatically dissolved?   The matter cannot be reconsidered for 6 months according to the Bylaws.  What are the formal next steps required of the Board if a decision needs to be made.  

 

An ad-hoc committee ceases to exist when its task is completed.  This normally means when it rises and reports to the parent body.  It doesn't matter whether the parent body adopts, rejects, or simply fails to act on the recommendation, or disposes of it in some other way.

Beyond that, there are no formal next steps required.  The term Reconsider has a highly specific parliamentary meaning that I suspect does not match what you mean when you say "according to the bylaws", so it's up to your organization to determine the meaning.

If a decision "needs to be made", and that decision is within the authority of the Board as set forth in the bylaws, then I suppose the Board should make it.  Whether the matter was ever considered by a committee, does not limit the ability of the Board to deal with it, if the rules in RONR apply.

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2 hours ago, Gary Novosielski said:

The term Reconsider has a highly specific parliamentary meaning that I suspect does not match what you mean when you say "according to the bylaws", so it's up to your organization to determine the meaning.

I suspect it means that the motion cannot be renewed for six months, which would be the correct parliamentary term for making a defeated motion anew. I am inclined to think that such a rule is in the nature of a rule of order and may be suspended by a 2/3 vote.

Edited by Josh Martin
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3 minutes ago, Josh Martin said:

I suspect it means that the motion cannot be renewed for six months, which would be the correct parliamentary term for making a defeated motion anew. I am inclined to think that such a rule is in the nature of a rule of order and may be suspended by a 2/3 vote.

 

I'm similarly inclined, presuming that is what the bylaws mean, or better yet, actually say.  🙂

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37 minutes ago, Josh Martin said:

I suspect it means that the motion cannot be renewed for six months, which would be the correct parliamentary term for making a defeated motion anew. I am inclined to think that such a rule is in the nature of a rule of order and may be suspended by a 2/3 vote.

That is correct. I read the bylaw as meaning renewed not reconsidered as it states.

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2 hours ago, Guest Susie said:

That is correct. I read the bylaw as meaning renewed not reconsidered as it states.

That makes sense.  If it were actually read to mean nothing could be Reconsidered for six months, it would have the effect of preventing Reconsideration entirely, since under existing rules in RONR it cannot be moved more than a day later, and often less.  And it certainly could not be moved after six months.  It would probably be worth the effort to fix the language in the bylaws.

But I agree with Mr. Martin that a rule preventing renewal of a defeated motion is in the nature of a rule of order, which could be suspended by a 2/3 vote, allowing the motion to be taken up.  I'd also note that renewal refers to the making of the same motion. If the Board wanted to consider a different motion from the recommendation that it rejected, no rule would prevent that. The same would apply if the Board did not consider and reject the recommendation but simply failed to act on it by not making a motion at the time

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