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Quest

Can the Officer vote in Board meetings?

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I have read several things that have left me unclear. We are an HOA board of 9 directors, a President, VP and Sec./Treasurer. ALL are elected positions by the membership annually. I am pondering running for the upcoming vacancy of Secretary/Treasurer. Will I be sacrificing my right to debate and vote? I understand in our annual member meeting officers can vote in ballot. But I read two different things regarding voting rights of OFFICERS. 

Thank you

 

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1 hour ago, Quest said:

I have read several things that have left me unclear. We are an HOA board of 9 directors, a President, VP and Sec./Treasurer. ALL are elected positions by the membership annually. I am pondering running for the upcoming vacancy of Secretary/Treasurer. Will I be sacrificing my right to debate and vote? I understand in our annual member meeting officers can vote in ballot. But I read two different things regarding voting rights of OFFICERS. 

Thank you

 

If I understand your question correctly I think this rule answers it for you:

"VOTING ON QUESTIONS AFFECTING ONESELF. The rule on abstaining from voting on a question of direct personal interest does not mean that a member should not vote for himself for an office or other position to which members generally are eligible, or should not vote when other members are included with him in a motion. If a member never voted on a question affecting himself, it would be impossible for a society to vote to hold a banquet, or for the majority to prevent a small minority from preferring charges against them and suspending or expelling them (61, 63). "  RONR (11th ed.), pp. 407-408

I'm adding another quote from the book just in case:

"An office carries with it only the rights necessary for executing the duties of the office, and it does not deprive a member of the society of his rights as a member."  RONR (11th ed.), p. 448

Edited by George Mervosh
Added another citation.

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2 hours ago, George Mervosh said:

  directorsIf I understand your question correctly I think this rule answers it for you:

"VOTING ON QUESTIONS AFFECTING ONESELF. The rule on abstaining from voting on a question of direct personal interest does not mean that a member should not vote for himself for an office or other position to which members generally are eligible, or should not vote when other members are included with him in a motion. If a member never voted on a question affecting himself, it would be impossible for a society to vote to hold a banquet, or for the majority to prevent a small minority from preferring charges against them and suspending or expelling them (61, 63). "  RONR (11th ed.), pp. 407-408

I'm adding another quote from the book just in case:

"An office carries with it only the rights necessary for executing the duties of the office, and it does not deprive a member of the society of his rights as a member."  RONR (11th ed.), p. 448

Roberts rules for dummies :) So...let's say our board is addressing a motion to change the pool to a salt pool. As secretary I can address that issue the same as all other board member in turn. And all debate has ended and the question presented by the chair...I can vote? 

Just to be clear, not addressing a vote affecting one's self...and what I was reading that confused me is a difference in the Board meeting and a full Member meeting addressing things like elections and bylaws...I know I could vote there but in our monthly general business meeting there seems to be a consensus of officers cannot vote...only the 9 directors

 

Odd...our board has held the consensus without any specified RULE that that office cannot.

So HOW does this affect the concept of a quorum? Our bylaws designate  directors and 3 officers. I was under the understanding that our Quorum is 5...the majority of 9. Is it instead a majority of 12?

Or does the quorum remain 5 and the officers don't count? I know this is an extension of my first question. IF I need to ask for clarification in a seperate thread just let me know.

Edited by Quest

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IF the officer is a member of the organization, then the officer has all the rights of a member at membership meetings. This applies to the named officers as well as the directors. (officers do not have to be members. Some associations, for example, appoint an employee such as the manager or executive director to be the Secretary)
So I don't think you give up any rights by being Secretary.

Similarly, if the officers are members of the Board, then they have the same rights as any other members of the Board. Check your bylaws to see exactly who is a member of the Board. This should help answer your quorum question.

The only officer who gives up some rights is the Presiding Officer, who usually does not move motions and only votes if their vote would affect the results.

Quote

So...let's say our board is addressing a motion to change the pool to a salt pool. As secretary I can address that issue the same as all other board member in turn. And all debate has ended and the question presented by the chair...I can vote? 

Assuming that the Secretary is a member of the board, Yes and Yes.

Edited by Atul Kapur
Added answer to the specific questions

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58 minutes ago, Quest said:

So...let's say our board is addressing a motion to change the pool to a salt pool. As secretary I can address that issue the same as all other board member in turn. And all debate has ended and the question presented by the chair...I can vote? 

You bet!  And feel free to use all the salty language at your command if someone tries to tell you that you cannot debate or vote!

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18 minutes ago, Atul Kapur said:

IF the officer is a member of the organization, then the officer has all the rights of a member at membership meetings. This applies to the named officers as well as the directors. (officers do not have to be members. Some associations, for example, appoint an employee such as the manager or executive director to be the Secretary)
So I don't think you give up any rights by being Secretary.

Similarly, if the officers are members of the Board, then they have the same rights as any other members of the Board. Check your bylaws to see exactly who is a member of the Board. This should help answer your quorum question.

The only officer who gives up some rights is the Presiding Officer, who usually does not move motions and only votes if their vote would affect the results.

 

Thank you

 

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10 minutes ago, jstackpo said:

You bet!  And feel free to use all the salty language at your command if someone tries to tell you that you cannot debate or vote!

Thank you

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