Jump to content
The Official RONR Q & A Forums
Guest KDRREPTG

Who takes minutes if Secretary is absent?

Recommended Posts

Guest KDRREPTG

If the "President should appoint someone" is the gerneral rule, is it permissible for the President to take the minutes? We're a very small board (Pres, VP, Sec, co-Treas, Teacher Rep, Principal) of a nonprofit school parent teacher group. If the President takes meeting minutes, can they be deemed invalid when approving at the next meeting?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this one case, it would probably have been better to add on to your previous question, which Guest Zev answered

Guest Zev did not say the President appoints someone. The group should elect someone to serve as Secretary pro tempore, for that meeting. The advice against having the president  do both is not because the minutes would be invalid but, rather, because it is difficult for one person to do both jobs well.

This can be done very simply. The president can suggest that someone, for example the vice-president, serve as the secretary for this meeting and ask if there's any objection. If there's no objection, then it's done.

Edited by Atul Kapur
Added last paragraph

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest KDRREPTG

Apparently I posted last night when falling asleep while researching and forgot. My apologies for the duplication!

I didn't mean that Guest Zev said that was the general rule, it's the only response I have found while researching this topic. Because we're so small and our meetings are quite simple & quick, I (President) had no problem holding the meeting and keeping notes. I was also the only one present who ever had taken meeting notes. A new board member (co-Treasurer) who was also absent from the mtg states now that the President can't take & submit the minutes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have the text in front of me, but doesn't RONR say something to the effect of there being two people needed: a presiding officer and a secretary? If so, doesn't that suggest they aren't the same person?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Joshua Katz said:

I don't have the text in front of me, but doesn't RONR say something to the effect of there being two people needed: a presiding officer and a secretary? If so, doesn't that suggest they aren't the same person?

That's the way I read it, but others have disagreed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Gary Novosielski said:

That's the way I read it, but others have disagreed.

I disagree - on the basis of RONR pg. 440, ll. 14-17, which states, "The assembly is free, however, to elect the same person to another office on a subsequent ballot, unless the bylaws prohibit a person from holding both offices simultaneously."

That's not specifically about a chair and a secretary, but in writing bylaws for organizations, I always try to be clear about which offices may and may not be combined.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Greg Goodwiller said:

I disagree - on the basis of RONR pg. 440, ll. 14-17, which states, "The assembly is free, however, to elect the same person to another office on a subsequent ballot, unless the bylaws prohibit a person from holding both offices simultaneously."

That's not specifically about a chair and a secretary, but in writing bylaws for organizations, I always try to be clear about which offices may and may not be combined.

That language is certainly there, but It appears to be more general than the rule that two officers--presiding and recording-are the minimum required for a meeting.  That's why I think the latter, as the more specific rule, should prevail. 

In my view, offices are not people; officers are.  A person can hold two offices, but cannot be two officers.  So I would argue that by adopting RONR, the organization has prohibited one officer from performing those two specific functions simultaneously at a given meeting of an assembly.

 

Edited by Gary Novosielski

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a "very small board" that follows the more relaxed rules for small boards, it is more likely that the presiding officer can also function as secretary or "scribe", as he is sometimes called. Nothing in RONR prohibits this arrangement; however, care should be taken that the combined responsibilities are not too onerous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest KDRREPTG
2 hours ago, reelsman said:

In a "very small board" that follows the more relaxed rules for small boards, it is more likely that the presiding officer can also function as secretary or "scribe", as he is sometimes called. Nothing in RONR prohibits this arrangement; however, care should be taken that the combined responsibilities are not too onerous.

That's what we are looking for- does RONR forbid the President from taking or submitting meeting minutes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...