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One-time bylaw? Bylaw modifying another bylaw?

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Guest Indiana Jones

My organization is changing the beginning and ending dates of its officers' terms. The dates themselves are not prescribed in the bylaws, but the lengths of terms are. If the organization approves a motion to change the dates (moving from a January 1 start to a July 1 start), some officers will have instantly exceeded their terms by six months.This necessitates a one-time lengthening of terms or a one-time modification of the bylaws that prescribe the length of terms. Can a bylaw be added that temporarily amends the bylaws that specify the limits? Can an amendment expire and its provisions revert? Thanks!

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8 minutes ago, Guest Indiana Jones said:

My organization is changing the beginning and ending dates of its officers' terms. The dates themselves are not prescribed in the bylaws, but the lengths of terms are. If the organization approves a motion to change the dates (moving from a January 1 start to a July 1 start), some officers will have instantly exceeded their terms by six months.This necessitates a one-time lengthening of terms or a one-time modification of the bylaws that prescribe the length of terms. Can a bylaw be added that temporarily amends the bylaws that specify the limits? Can an amendment expire and its provisions revert? Thanks!

This can be done by a "proviso."  It is a second clause stating that some amendment will not go into effect immediately.  See pp. 597-8.

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Agreeing with the post above  by J.J., you might want to consider adding a simple phrase to your bylaw provision on terms of office to change it from "one year" (or two years, or whatever) or from specifying definite start and end dates, to include the phrase "and until their successors are elected".  This insures that if the required annual meeting  for election of officers cannot be held as prescribed in the bylaws, the officers and board members continue to serve until  their successors are elected.  That is the option recommended by RONR.

Note:  You can also say "OR until their successors are elected".  Both variations of the wording accomplishing the same thing as to continuing to serve until their  successors are elected, but the use of the word "or" rather than "and" makes it easier to remove officers during their terms.  See FAQ No. 20 on the main website for more information:  https://robertsrules.com/faq.html#20

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1 hour ago, mirandas said:

What you think about it?

The article may or may not be correct as a matter of law, but I don't find it to be a very good description of these terms as a matter of parliamentary law. I prefer RONR's description which can be found in RONR, 11th ed., pgs. 12-15.

More importantly, I don't understand why you think this information is relevant to the original poster's question, since nothing in the original post indicates that the organization has a separate constitution and bylaws. Rather, it seems the organization just has bylaws, as is most common in the present day and as RONR recommends.

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I know of no circumstance where a private organization (or governmental body) in the US that has an "unwritten constitution."  They may have customs. 

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