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Guest Ralph Adams

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If a meeting start time has been posted but does not start on time, such as two hours late, can members of the board require the minutes reflect the delayed start time and reason?

The minutes should include the time the meeting is called to order, among many other details. These can be found starting on page 451. (Hope you have The Book)

As for inclusion of the reason for the delay, you'll be getting more responses, so stay tuned.

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First off, next time the meeting time arrives and the President or VP are not around, open the meeting on time and elect someone to preside until they show up. No need to wait.

The assembly can better record their displeasure at the starting time in the minutes by moving to censure the president for being two hours late. Especially if the motion is adopted.

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If a meeting start time has been posted but does not start on time, such as two hours late, can members of the board require the minutes reflect the delayed start time and reason?

Q. Did you have a quorum at the proper start hour?

Q. If you did have a quorum, then WHY did you bother to wait two hours? Why didn't you start on time?

The reason for the delay is not recorded in the minutes.

However, a motion could be made to see that some text or some reason is included so.

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There is a long standing debate about what is a quorum. Those seated in the meeting and waiting to start believe we had a quorum. Those intentionally staying out of the meeting believe we did not have a quorum and that we could not start the meeting until they were ready and had finished making their plan of action on a particular item of business. The association Parliamentarian was not able to be at the meeting. The Parliamentarian says we had a quorum and has since explained that to the Board even though some Board members continue to agrue that we did not have a quorum. The wording in the By-Laws regarding a quorum is not well written and needs to be amended.

Thanks for all of the comments, we can attempt making a motion to include the reason for delay into the minutes.

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There is a long standing debate about what is a quorum. Those seated in the meeting and waiting to start believe we had a quorum. Those intentionally staying out of the meeting believe we did not have a quorum and that we could not start the meeting until they were ready and had finished making their plan of action on a particular item of business.

The quorum is based on the number of members in the meeting room. They don't necessarily have to be seated and they don't have to "finish making their plan of action" (whatever that means).

You don't count members waiting out in the hall.

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There is a long standing debate about what is a quorum. Those seated in the meeting and waiting to start believe we had a quorum. Those intentionally staying out of the meeting believe we did not have a quorum and that we could not start the meeting until they were ready and had finished making their plan of action on a particular item of business. The association Parliamentarian was not able to be at the meeting. The Parliamentarian says we had a quorum and has since explained that to the Board even though some Board members continue to agrue that we did not have a quorum. The wording in the By-Laws regarding a quorum is not well written and needs to be amended.

Thanks for all of the comments, we can attempt making a motion to include the reason for delay into the minutes.

Well, a quorum is the "number of voting members who must be present in order that business can be legally transacted." And that number is in your bylaws (in some fashion, no matter how poorly worded). So depending on your bylaw wording, which only your organization can interpret, that's what you should go by.

If the meeting hadn't been called to order yet (in that two hour interim), members seated in the meeting hall "waiting to start" are simply that - members sitting around. I'd be inclined to say there is no meeting until the Chair (or other appropriate person) calls it to order. Heck - you can even have a meeting without a quorum, you just can't do a whole heck of a lot. You don't need a quorum to call a meeting to order or to adjourn. And I'd be inclined to say (in my opinion at least) that you don't technically have a quorum until the meeting is called to order.

Those "intentionally staying out of the meeting" - if the meeting hadn't yet been called to order - aren't actually staying out of a meeting (assuming it hadn't been called to order yet). They're just waiting around in some other location, plotting their deviousness.

So

1) Was the meeting called to order two hours late, or was it called to order and then everyone sat around for two hours waiting to get on with business?

2) How many voting members were present in the meeting hall at the time the Chair called it to order?

2a) And a subsidiary question is: Did enough of them stay or enter the meeting hall to maintain/create a quorum during the business transacted?

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