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postpone indefinitly


Guest gregg

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our bylaws state that a vote of 2/3 is required by our executive committee, a vote was taken at this meeting and it was postpone indefinitly, Does it need to come back to the executive committee again at another session before it it can brought before the state board.

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Our bylaws state that a vote of 2/3 is required by our executive committee.

A vote was taken at this meeting and it was postpone indefinitly.

Does it need to come back to the executive committee again at another session before it it can brought before the state board.

Hold your horses.

What relationship does this "state board" hold over (or hold under) the executive committee?

For example, is the executive committee the superior body?

For example, is the organization who controls this state board independent of the organization who controls this "executive committee"?

***

For that matter, since your executive committee voted to Postpone Indefinitely the issue, then there is no issue which can be "brought" anywhere. - Your executive committee has taken no stand on the issue, pro or con.

You cannot "bring" that which does not exist, you know.

Who did you have in mind to do the "bringing"? (Since it cannot be "brought by" your executive committee.)

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Hold your horses.

What relationship does this "state board" hold over (or hold under) the executive committee?

For example, is the executive committee the superior body?

For example, is the organization who controls this state board independent of the organization who controls this "executive committee"?

***

For that matter, since your executive committee voted to Postpone Indefinitely the issue, then there is no issue which can be "brought" anywhere. - Your executive committee has taken no stand on the issue, pro or con.

You cannot "bring" that which does not exist, you know.

Who did you have in mind to do the "bringing"? (Since it cannot be "brought by" your executive committee.)

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our executive board is a board within aboard, and has power over state board, which does include the executive members. any changes to our bylaws require a 2/3 vote for passing, infact it was postponed indefinitly. At our state board meeting, our president brought it up for a vote, saying that they had 90 days to revisit this issue. First, I feel the it was not passed and should not of been brought up at state meeting. However a vote was taken and it was a tie, then president voted to break tie and then said that the change had been approved. How do we go about reversing this misjustice

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Our executive board is a board within a board, and has power over state board, which does include the executive members.

Okay.

Any changes to our bylaws require a 2/3 vote for passing, in fact it was postponed indefinitely.

By the body who did the Postponing Indefinitely?

You did say:

"Our bylaws state that a vote of 2/3 is required by our executive committee, ...".

So, instead of amending the bylaws, no amending of any kind occurred.

Right?

At our state board meeting, our president brought it up for a vote, saying that they had 90 days to revisit this issue
.

Wait a minute.

I thought you said the "executive board" (your "board within a board") was the proper body to amend your bylaws.

What is doing on?

How did the inferior body (your state board) get involved?

First, I feel the it was not passed and should not of been brought up at state meeting.

Agreed.

Why is the wrong party amending (or trying to amend) your bylaws?

However a vote was taken and it was a tie, then president voted to break tie and then said that the change had been approved.

How do we go about reversing this misjustice?

The superior body, namely, your executive board, is under no obligation to recognize the action of your state board (the inferior body), since your state board cannot amend your bylaws, and your executive board can amend your bylaws.

You have not cited your bylaws' METHOD OF AMENDMENT.

Are you sure your state board has no say in the process?

You president thinks so.

A majority of the state board thinks so.

Maybe YOU (the minority) are mistaken?

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any changes to our bylwas come to the executive committee for passing with a 2/3 vote, if they are passed by a 2/3 vote, then the are presented to the State board for approval, whuich also has to be a 2/3 vote to pass changes. Being as the State executive committee did not pass the changes by a 2/3 vote, then how can this be presented to the state Board for a vote.

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any changes to our bylwas come to the executive committee for passing with a 2/3 vote, if they are passed by a 2/3 vote, then the are presented to the State board for approval, whuich also has to be a 2/3 vote to pass changes. Being as the State executive committee did not pass the changes by a 2/3 vote, then how can this be presented to the state Board for a vote.

I cannot reconcile your recent post with your latest post.

If the state board is the party with FINAL APPROVAL, then how do you figure that the executive board is superior to the state board?

original post:

our bylaws state that a vote of 2/3 is required by our executive committee, a vote was taken at this meeting and it was postpone indefinitly, Does it need to come back to the executive committee again at another session before it it can brought before the state board.

I don't think an answer is possible WITHIN ROBERT'S RULES OF ORDER.

You are asking a question of complexity between two parties, both of which are powerless under Robert's Rules of Order (but otherwise empowered via your bylaws).

Someone will have to read your bylaws, i.e., the METHOD OF AMENDMENT.

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I cannot reconcile your recent post with your latest post.

Amen.

Gregg, you need to get it straight which body is over which... and not just for this issue. It's a basic point. An executive committee would normally be subordinate to a board. That doesn't mean it's the case with your organization, though. Check your bylaws.

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