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Larry Cisar

2011 is here

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point of order! Its still 2010

A point of order is raised that it is still 2010. While that is true, the poster's point is not well-taken.

At this moment, both years exist on the Earth at the same time, so it is both still 2010 and already 2011. As the midnight line moves west, New Year's Day becomes, with time, a larger fraction of the planet, until it covers the globe. It then lasts another 24 hours, as it is slowly replaced by January 2nd. In this way, every calendar day actually lasts for a full 48 hours, from the moment it first appears in the "Mike" time zone just west of the International Date Line, until the last sliver of it disappears from the "Yankee" time zone, just across the line, 48 hours later.

The poster will please be seated.

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A point of order is raised that it is still 2010. While that is true, the poster's point is not well-taken.

At this moment, both years exist on the Earth at the same time, so it is both still 2010 and already 2011. As the midnight line moves west, New Year's Day becomes, with time, a larger fraction of the planet, until it covers the globe. It then lasts another 24 hours, as it is slowly replaced by January 2nd. In this way, every calendar day actually lasts for a full 48 hours, from the moment it first appears in the "Mike" time zone just west of the International Date Line, until the last sliver of it disappears from the "Yankee" time zone, just across the line, 48 hours later.

The poster will please be seated.

I appeal from the decision of the chair. At this time of year, each calendar day exists for 49 hours across our splendid planet.

The first city to reach January 1 is Kiritimati, which is 14 hours ahead of UTC. The last city to reach the new year is Pago Pago, which is 11 hours behind UTC. So, Kiritimati starts Jan. 1 on Friday at 10:00 AM UTC, and Pago Pago ends Jan. 1 on Sunday at 11:00 AM UTC. This time interval is 49 hours.

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I appeal from the decision of the chair. At this time of year, each calendar day exists for 49 hours across our splendid planet.

The first city to reach January 1 is Kiritimati, which is 14 hours ahead of UTC. The last city to reach the new year is Pago Pago, which is 11 hours behind UTC. So, Kiritimati starts Jan. 1 on Friday at 10:00 AM UTC, and Pago Pago ends Jan. 1 on Sunday at 11:00 AM UTC. This time interval is 49 hours.

The appeal fails for lack of a second.

But even if it had not, the figure of 49 hours fails to support the point of order, to wit, that New Year's greetings were untimely. Quite the contrary. The additional hour supports the the chair's ruling that the motion to
Exchange Greetings
was in order. For this reason, the chair chose to omit discussion of the additional effects of atypical time zones and daylight time from his brief explanation..

The question is on the motion.

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