Jump to content
The Official RONR Q & A Forums

Motions by non voting members


Guest R Lanford

Recommended Posts

If someone is a member of a board but has no voting rights, can that person make a motion?

There's no such thing as a "non-voting member" in RONR. As a consequence, it will be up to your organization to interpret its own Bylaws to determine the rights of such a member. See RONR, 10th ed., pgs. 570-573 for some Principles of Interpretation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's no such thing as a "non-voting member" in RONR. As a consequence, it will be up to your organization to interpret its own Bylaws to determine the rights of such a member. See RONR, 10th ed., pgs. 570-573 for some Principles of Interpretation.

Well, to be fair, the sample bylaws do define Honorary Life Membership which restricts such a member from voting, among other activities. So, there is a hint of it in there. (although it's not an RONR definition, but a bylaw definition, yes.)

If someone is a member of a board but has no voting rights, can that person make a motion?

R. Lanford - how is it that this member does not have the right to vote? Is it so noted in the bylaws regarding their "level" of membership? Some (many?) here would say that if one of the rights of membership (make motions, speak in debate, vote) is specifically restricted (in the bylaws for example), the others are retained. So, perhaps a little more information would be helpful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, to be fair, the sample bylaws do define Honorary Life Membership which restricts such a member from voting, among other activities. So, there is a hint of it in there. (although it's not an RONR definition, but a bylaw definition, yes.)

The honorary members in the sample Bylaws are not true members. (RONR, 10th ed., pg. 573, lines 3-17)

R. Lanford - how is it that this member does not have the right to vote? Is it so noted in the bylaws regarding their "level" of membership? Some (many?) here would say that if one of the rights of membership (make motions, speak in debate, vote) is specifically restricted (in the bylaws for example), the others are retained.

As you have just helpfully pointed out, it depends on how this is defined in the Bylaws. You are now referring to Principle of Interpretation #6, but Principle of Interpretation #8 (which addresses your previous example) is also quite important in interpreting this question. If all the Bylaws say is "So and so is a non-voting member," then I agree that POI #6 seems highly persuasive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The honorary members in the sample Bylaws are not true members. (RONR, 10th ed., pg. 573, lines 3-17)

...

As you have just helpfully pointed out, it depends on how this is defined in the Bylaws. You are now referring to Principle of Interpretation #6, but Principle of Interpretation #8 (which addresses your previous example) is also quite important in interpreting this question. If all the Bylaws say is "So and so is a non-voting member," then I agree that POI #6 seems highly persuasive.

Thanks for the several clarifications. Let's hope we get some additional from R Lanford.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The rights of membership include attending meetings, making motions, speaking in debate, and voting.

I assume your bylaws say something like: "The executive director is an ex officio member of the board without vote."

The principles for interpreting your bylaws (page 571-572) say "A prohibition or limitation ... also permits things of the same class that are not mentioned in the prohibition or limitation and that are evidently not improper."

Therefore IMO (and also in the opinion of the NAP Parliamentary Research Committee) the executive director would have all the rights of membership except voting. Note that he would have the right to attend all board meetings including those held in executive session.

-Bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...