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Daniel H. Honemann

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  1. As far as the rules in RONR are concerned, the answer to your first question is "yes", and the answer to your second question is "no."
  2. No, these are not rules that can be suspended (unless the bylaws specifically provide for their suspension, which apparently is not the case). The bylaws will have to be amended in order to make any change in these rules.
  3. Is this the same Board as the one to which you refer in your previous thread? If so, you have advised us that the bylaws provide as follows: "At least seven (7) days prior to all Board meetings, excluding Executive and Special Sessions, an agenda, subject to amendment, shall be posted in XXXX Facilities and/or on the XXXX website" Is this absolutely all that the bylaws say concerning agendas for meetings of this Board? Isn't there something more somewhere which would shed some light upon who is responsible for preparing and posting this agenda, and what, exactly, is meant by "subject to amendment"? You have further advised us that "The Articles also gives the Board the power to amend, modify, revise, or revoke the Bylaws on their own, so if it was ever possible to actually hold a General Membership meeting with a quorum, it appears that anything the General Membership does can be revoked by the Board." It would appear, therefore, that this is an instance in which full power and authority over the conduct of Board meetings is vested solely in the Board". If this is the same Board as the one to which you refer in your previous thread, and if what you posted is absolutely all that the bylaws (or the "Articles" you mentioned) say concerning agendas for meetings of this Board, then it would appear that the Board has the power, at its meeting, to adopt an agenda for its meeting which precludes the introduction of New Business, but to do so will require a two-thirds vote. Even if it does this, the board, later on during its meeting, may, by a two thirds vote or the vote of a majority of its entire membership, amend the agenda it adopted to allow for the introduction of New Business (or, by a two-thirds vote) agree to suspend the rules to allow for the introduction of an item of New Business). In other words, if all of these assumptions I have made are correct, I think the short answer to your question is "no". đŸ™‚
  4. Well, if a recess or adjournment is scheduled in an adopted agenda to follow immediately upon the disposition of another item in that agenda, the time for that recess or adjournment has been established. Although no hour has been assigned to it, a particular time has been.
  5. I'm inclined to agree with this so far as it relates to making an item of business the special order for a meeting is concerned, but I think it has nothing to do with the fact that an assembly may, at the outset of the meeting at which the special order is to be taken up, adopt an agenda calling for adjournment immediately following its disposition of the special order.
  6. By adopting, at the outset of the meeting at which the special order is to be taken up, an agenda calling for adjournment immediately following the special order. đŸ™‚
  7. "By a single vote, a series of special orders or general orders—or a mixture of both—can be made; such a series is called an agenda. When an hour is assigned to a particular subject in an agenda, that subject is thereby made a special order unless, by footnote or other means, it is stated that the time is intended merely for guidance, in which case the subject is only a general order. Subjects for which no hour is specified in an agenda are general orders.' (RONR, 11th ed., p. 371, ll. 17-24) It seems to me that a recess or an adjournment can be included in an agenda as immediately following another item, without any hour being assigned to it.
  8. I would think that, even if the standard order of business is otherwise the prescribed order of business for its regular meetings, an organization* is free to adopt a special order of business for its regular meetings which departs from the standard order in any respect that it wishes. By the same token, I would think that, at any one of it's regular meetings, it's assembly could adopt, by a two-thirds vote, a special order of business (agenda, program) to be placed in effect for the duration of its current session only, and that this too may depart from the standard order in any respect that it wishes. But I'm open to being taught otherwise. đŸ™‚ ---------------------------------------------- * It should be understood that I am not here referring to a subordinate board.
  9. So suppose an assembly has adopted the Agenda found on pages 16-17 of RONRIB (2nd ed.) except that there is no provision for New Business, and Item XI, the last item on the Agenda, is Adjournment. What happens then?
  10. You sure about this? Won't it take a two-thirds vote or a vote of a majority of the entire membership (or unanimous consent)?
  11. I stand by my response to the question asked.
  12. The best way to change your bylaws is to follow the procedure set forth in them for doing so. If you cannot have the sort of meeting required to change the bylaws you cannot change them.
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