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Watson

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About Watson

  • Rank
    Dr. Robert T. Workinger
  • Birthday 03/08/1944

Profile Information

  • Location:
    Saint Germain, Wisconsin
  • Interests
    Musky Fishing; Substitute Teaching; Hunter Safety Education
  1. Exactly who 'appoints' a Director to an Executive Position? The Board? The general membership? Since the position of Treasurer is vacant, what do the Bylaws say, if anything, about filling vacancies? Is there enough time before the Annual General Meeting for the Board to convene a Special Meeting?
  2. When should the results, or process, of an election be challenged, and how do you do it?
  3. Guest Greg has posed two questions. Mr. Huynh's response of "No" would be contradictory if applied to both questions. Perhaps he would be kind enough to clarify his meaning(s).
  4. At the annual stockholders' meeting, a nominating committee presents a list of nominees -- one person for each position on the board of directors. Nominations are also taken from the floor. Each shareholder controls a number of votes equal to the number of shares held. Shareholders not present in person may vote their shares in advance of the meeting by written proxy (of course, they will not be aware of any nominations from the floor). If there are no nominations from the floor, are the original nominees elected by acclamation? Should the nominees be voted on one at a time in the order nominated? Does it make a difference if the original nominees are referred to as a "slate?"
  5. In our 10-member assembly, the names of those members present are recorded at the start of the meeting. Thereafter, most questions are decided by Roll Call Votes. The minutes will read something like, "Ayes 8, Tom Bell and Jim Caldwell voted Noe" or "Dan Cooper voted Aye, all others voted Noe." Motion Carried/Lost. It probably seems a bit picky, but it seems to me that a Roll Call Vote should be precisely recorded as to name and action. What exactly is the secretary's responsibility? Comments?
  6. Thanks to all of you for your attention to my question. There are people here who believe that a committee be required to have a non-member secretary keep minutes and immediately submit those minutes to the parent assembly as the committee's 'report'. The committee members, therefore, never have an opportunity to review those minutes before they are distributed and errors remain uncorrected before such minutes are 'filed' as a permanent record. I personally agree that this is a sorry attempt to improve on RONR. When opportunities present themselves, I try to diplomatically bring about change. Same old story; I'm sure you've all been there. It's the tale of Sisyphus all over again.
  7. If circumstances require that the minutes of a standing committee be approved before its next regular committee meeting, and calling a special meeting just for that purpose is not possible, what other options are available? (Note: This committee is empowered to make its own rules of procedure and all members have access to email.) Thank you.
  8. The secretary (City Clerk) of our city (Common Council) meetings routinely records in the minutes paraphrased summaries of citizens' remarks made during the public comment period on the agendum. Recently she also tried to paraphrase my contribution to a discussion which took place with a main motion on the floor. Short comments by other individuals (aldermen) were not mentioned, and I felt that her paraphrasing of my remarks was somewhat slanted. There is no special rule of order addressing what should be included in the minutes, and I find such attempts to summarize comments 'for the record' to definitely be not in keeping with RONR, our parliamentary authority. Other city officials feel that the clerk's actions provide a necessary contribution to 'transparency' and to keeping an accurate record of the proceedings. Your comments and/or recommended course of action will be much appreciated.
  9. In an ordinary society that meets monthly, does the motion to Postpone Indefinitely remain in effect beyond the current session? At a future meeting, is it necessary to re-introduce the main motion as a totally new resolution? Thank you.
  10. When a nonmember or guest is present at a committee meeting, does RONR specify a proper procedure for asking or allowing this person to address the committee?
  11. The bylaws read: "The presiding officer shall . . . conduct the proceedings of the meeting in accordance with the parliamentary rules contained in Robert's Rules of Order, Newly Revised, unless otherwise provided by statute or by the rules in this chapter." Recently, after researching a topic, I quoted RONR (11th ed.). Immediately another member stated that this was incorrect and that I must reference the 10th Edition because that was the edition in use when the bylaws were written and approved. Not wishing to be confrontational, is there an Official Interpretation to which I may refer in response? Thank you, RTW
  12. [if my question is beyond the scope of this Forum, I will understand.] If the bylaws require that certain types of resolutions (e.g. ordinance) be read twice before the assembly prior to voting: (1) Must the readings be at consecutive regular meetings, or could the readings take place , say, anytime within a quarterly interval? (2) Is discussion/debate in order after the first reading? (3) If the resolution is amended, either on the floor or by committee, is an additional reading required? Thank you, RTW
  13. RONR, p. 503, ll. 24-28: "In the case of a committee, however, if it is impractical to bring its members together for a meeting, the report of the committee can contain what has been agreed to by every one of its members." Gary & George -- Maybe my interpretation was incorrect. This committee cannot hold a totally electronic meeting because of the problem of complying with the state open meetings law. Therefore, at a bi-monthly regular meeting with a quorum present, what vote is necessary to immediately report out its recommendation to the assembly?
  14. Our standing committee meets on the first and third Mondays of the month, and the assembly to which the committee reports meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. Business automatically referred to our committee frequently requires reporting committee recommendations to the assembly within one to eight days. If all members of the committee are present at a meeting, and the committee recommendations are unanimously approved by counted votes, the report satisfies the requirement of RONR, p. 503, ll. 24-28. Question No.1: If a recommendation is approved by less than a unanimous vote, or if one of the committee members abstains, must submission of the committee recommendation to the assembly wait until after a subsequent meeting of the committee? Question No. 2: Given the presence of a quorum, can the instructions to the comittee be amended to allow an absent individual to vote by electronic signature on an otherwise unanimously approved recommendation? Thank you for your attention and thoughts!
  15. JOINT MEETING RTW Members Our Council [11 Members] has appointed a Board of [5] Commissioners. Now we would like all 16 individuals to meet jointly in a special meeting with equal status and parliamentary rights. Does RONR propose a proper format for such a meeting? Should the presiding officer be a third party, or chosen from within the group? #2 Professional Registered Parliamentarian Members Does RONR propose a proper format for such a meeting? No. The term "joint meeting" is not used in RONR (except in the case of a merger of two societies, which does not apply here). I can think of two ways to establish a joint meeting. One of the assemblies (probably the council, in this case) could create a special committee consisting of all the members of both assemblies, or you could hold a mass meeting which invites all the members of both assemblies (the joint meeting used to merge societies is the latter type). RTW Should the presiding officer be a third party, or chosen from within the group? That's up to the assembly. If you go the special committee route, you can have the assembly which appoints the committee select the chairman or leave it to the committee to elect its own chairman. A mass meeting elects its own chairman. #3 Edgar RTW Now we would like all 16 individuals to meet jointly in a special meeting with equal status and parliamentary rights. Aside from the right to attend and speak (a courtesy that can be afforded to non-members), what's the point? This combination of bodies wouldn't constitute a body in its own right so any votes that were taken and decisions made would be, I think, immaterial. To put it another way, what do you hope to accomplish at this joint gathering that couldn't be accomplished at a meeting of the council to which the commissioners were invited to attend and speak? #4 Members Parliamentary rights to do what? And in the name of which body? I don't understand how an appointed board, presumably a subordinate body to the council, can have equal status in a meeting. If both bodies are meeting, and a motion passes, which body passed it? #5 Members Gary Novosielski Parliamentary rights to do what? And in the name of which body? I don't understand how an appointed board, presumably a subordinate body to the council, can have equal status in a meeting. If both bodies are meeting, and a motion passes, which body passed it? By taking Mr. Martin's answer to a logical next step, the board and committee could be appointed to a special committee, proceeding to conduct a committee hearing regarding some significant pending business.
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