Jump to content
The Official RONR Q & A Forums

Choosing to abstain


ARYOUNG
 Share

Recommended Posts

11 hours ago, ARYOUNG said:

What if the only time the county commission chairman is supposed to vote is to break a tie, but chooses to abstain because he needs more "verbiage"?

So far as RONR is concerned, a member has a right to abstain, period. If your organization's rules or applicable law provide otherwise, those rules take precedence, but we can't interpret those rules for you.

11 hours ago, ARYOUNG said:

How would other commissioners go about censuring the BOC Chair? Just a motion? If censured, what would be the outcome of such? Would the initial vote be re-voted upon?

If the desire is to bring back the original motion, a member should either make the motion anew (if the original motion failed) or move to Rescind the original motion (if the original motion passed).

Unless your rules provide otherwise, censure is simply a main motion. The outcome is that the assembly has formally expressed its disapproval of the chair. There is no effect on the original motion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, ARYOUNG said:

Q1.) How would other commissioners go about censuring the BOC Chair? Just a motion?

Q2.) If censured, what would be the outcome of such?

Q3.) Would the initial vote be re-voted upon?

A1.) Wait a minute. For what reason would the "other commissioners" justify adopting a motion of censure? Would it be because the "county commission chairman" had abstained? i.e., exercised a right? That's not right. You cannot embarrass a member because a parliamentary right has been exercised. You would look like a fool. A chair is not obligated under parliamentary law to break ties. The chair is free to let ties remain in place.

A2.) An act of censure takes away no rights, and suspends no one, and suspends nothing. A motion of censure may be moved without a formal disciplinary action preceding it. A motion of commendation may be amended into a motion of censure, and vice-versa. It is an opinion, it is an expression. Nothing more.

A3.) No. Of course not. Why would "the initial vote be re-voted on"? How does one thing relate to the other?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, ARYOUNG said:

What if the only time the county commission chairman is supposed to vote is to break a tie, but chooses to abstain because he needs more "verbiage"?

If the chair may vote only in the event of a tie (which is not the rule in RONR, by the way), yet chooses to abstain instead, that's fine.  

However, a tie vote simply defeats the motion then and there.  It does not hang around in limbo waiting for "verbiage" to emerge.  So the chair, either by voting No or by abstaining, has effectively decided to defeat the motion.

And no, you can't censure someone for exercising a basic right.  At least not if you expect to be taken seriously.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...