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Outside advisors attending member meetings


The Fessor
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6 minutes ago, The Fessor said:

I can't find any rule that allows or prohibits outside advisors such as attorneys or accountants who represent the association attending and contributing to member meetings. Is there a rule that covers this?

Take a look at pages 644-45 in RONR, 11th ed.

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" A society has the right to determine who may be present at its meetings and to control its hall while meetings are in progress; but all members have the right to attend except in cases where the bylaws provide for the automatic suspension of members who fall in arrears in payment of their dues, or where the society has, by vote and as a penalty imposed for a specific offense, forbidden attendance. 


Nonmembers, on the other hand—or a particular nonmember or group of nonmembers—can be excluded at any time from part or all of a meeting of a society, or from all of its meetings. Such exclusion can be effected by a ruling of the chair in cases of disorder, or by the adoption of a rule on the subject, or by an appropriate motion as the need arises—a motion of the latter nature being a question of privilege [page 645] (19). A motion to exclude all nonmembers (except absolutely necessary staff, if any) is often referred to as a motion to "go into executive session" (see 9). "  RONR (11th ed.), pp. 644-45.

also:

"Any nonmembers allowed in the hall during a meeting, as guests of the organization, have no rights with reference to the proceedings (pp. 644–45). "  RONR (11th ed.), p. 648

The bottom line is, the assembly decides if non members may attend or speak.

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12 hours ago, The Fessor said:

George...when you say "The bottom line is, the assembly decides if non members may attend or speak.", is it your view that the decision to allow the non-member advisor can be a majority, or must it be unanimous?

 

It's a safe bet that if no particular threshold is specified, the phrase The assembly decides can be read to mean (A majority vote of) the assembly decides.   

Of course unanimous consent would also be fine.

Edited by Gary Novosielski
Add the word: vote.
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Guest Who's Coming to Dinner
6 hours ago, Gary Novosielski said:

It's a safe bet that if no particular threshold is specified, the phrase The assembly decides can be read to mean (A majority of) the assembly decides

It's a majority of votes which decides.

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6 hours ago, Gary Novosielski said:

It's a safe bet that if no particular threshold is specified, the phrase The assembly decides can be read to mean (A majority of) the assembly decides.   

Of course unanimous consent would also be fine.

 

7 minutes ago, Guest Who's Coming to Dinner said:

It's a majority of votes which decides.

Yes.  That's a minor but important distinction.  The issue is decided by a majority vote... that is, the vote of a majority of the members present and voting.  If 50 people are present and 20 vote yes, 15 vote no 15 abstain, that is a majority vote even though it is less than a majority of the members present.

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