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President voting when it pertains to her


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The President of a very small board of directors (5 members) is the subject of an upcoming vote. She wants to appoint herself as the co-director of a chorus. The anticipated result is probably going to be a tie.  I know that a tie fails and that the President can vote if she wants the motion adopted. However as this is about her, I am not sure she should vote.  What should be done? 

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Well, first, as it is a small board, the President can vote with the others, not only when her vote is decisive. That said, a person should abstain when he has a personal or pecuniary interest not in common with the others. If this is deemed such a personal interest, though, the fact remains that nothing can be done - the person, having the right to vote, cannot be forced to abstain.

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RONR (page 407) sez:

ABSTAINING FROM VOTING ON A QUESTION OF DIRECT PERSONAL INTEREST. No member should vote on a question in which he has a direct personal or pecuniary interest not common to other members of the organization. For example, if a motion proposes that the organization enter into a contract with a commercial firm of which a member of the organization is an officer and from which contract he would derive personal pecuniary profit, the member should abstain from voting on the motion. However, no member can be compelled to refrain from voting in such circumstances.

Robert, Henry M. III. Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, 11th edition (Robert's Rules of Order (Hardcover)) (Kindle Locations 7992-7996). Perseus Books Group. Kindle Edition.

I'll leave it to you and your president to decide whether this applies to her and the chorus director position.

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I'm sure that RONR notes somewhere that the "should not" rule on voting where one has a personal interest does not apply to voting for oneself in an election.

I presume that the president does not actually have the sole power to appoint anyone, or there would be no need for a vote at all.  And if the board is to vote on who shall have this position, then it may be in the nature of an election, with nominations preceding it.  If no one else is nominated, the chair may declare herself elected by acclamation.

Is this perhaps under a rule where the president appoints, subject to the ratification by the board?

 

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6 hours ago, Gary Novosielski said:

I'm sure that RONR notes somewhere that the "should not" rule on voting where one has a personal interest does not apply to voting for oneself in an election.

Yes, indeed  --  immediately after the quoted citation on p. 407.   Looks like your powers of recall are still strong!

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