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Meeting Minute Close Discussion/Complaints?


Guest Crusher18
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Hello! I have recently been doing discussion as secretary for my church and it came down to the minutes. I mentioned in the minutes that we have someone close a discussion during the meeting and I've been told no because it's not the way how they do it even though I have experienced this at my alma meter. Is there any official proof in RRO or any parliamentary about closing discussion and objection/complaints made to put in the minutes?

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I'm new to this site so I am trying my best to word this correctly. 

As secretary I'm trying to record what's being discussed during the minutes. When I type a proposal, there is a part where I believe that I am supposed to type "closed discussion" after someone seconds the proposal? Here's an example:

Motion 3.1 Person A proposed to buy paint supplies for *insert church name here*

                    - Person B seconded

                    - Person C closed discussion

Would this be correct to add in the minutes? I've been told that there isn't anything about this in RRO or parliamentary so I wanted to check into this.

Edited by Crusher18
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The motion should be recorded this way:

On a motion by Person A, it was voted to buy pain for *insert church name here*.

Or:

Person A moved to buy pain for *insert church name here*.  After debate, the motion was adopted/was not adopted.

Or:

Person A made a motion which, following debate and amendment read "buy pain for * insert church name here*."  The motion was/was not adopted.

In particular, the seconder should not be included, and no bullet points should be used.  No motions about debate, such as limit or extend limits of debate, or the previous question, should be included.  I think the notation you have: "Person C closed discussion" is meant to refer to the previous question.  There may be some issues with the procedure being used during your meetings, but that goes beyond the question you asked.  Just to note, though, no individual can make debate end.  A motion for the previous question can be made, but it must be adopted by the assembly.  

If, for clarity, the motion for the previous question needs to be included, it should be done like this:  The previous question having been ordered, ... (This might arise, for instance, in explaining why the chair ruled a motion out of order.)

 

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5 minutes ago, Crusher18 said:

C I can understand, but how so for B?

The seconder is not included in the minutes, nor the fact that the motion was seconded (which is immaterial anyway once debate has begun).  See RONR, 11th ed., p. 469-73.  Note: The sample minutes include an original main motion and an amendment separately.  I think this is because the motion was referred to committee with a pending amendment.  Had the amendment been resolved, the motion would simply have been recorded as it ultimately read.

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Crusher, do you have a copy of RONR or RONR in Brief?  If not, I suggest you at least get a copy of the "In Brief" version of RONR.  It's around seven dollars in bookstores, from Amazon and from NAP (The National Association of Parliamentarians).  http://www.robertsrules.com/inbrief.html    It gives you the basics of parliamentary procedure.   Or, get the "real deal", The Right Book, RONR:  It's available for around $12 to $18, depending on where you buy it.  Both books have a section on minutes with sample wording.   http://www.robertsrules.com/book.html

The NAP bookstore also has several booklets and pamphlets on minutes and duties of the secretary.   Click on "Store" at the top of the home page.  http://www.parliamentarians.org/

 

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, Crusher18 said:

C I can understand, but how so for B?

Regarding Person C, it is not possible for one person to close discussion.  One person may move the Previous Question, but it requires a second and a 2/3 vote to actually close discussion/debate.  Debate may also simply end because nobody else seeks recognition or the time agreed upon expires.  None of this needs to be recorded in the minutes.

Person B, the seconder, is not normally recorded either.  It is likely that the identity of seconder would not even be known, since the process of seconding does not require recognition.  Upon hearing a second, the chair would simply proceed to state the question without seeking to identify the seconder.  It is common that two or more people may call out "Second!" at roughly the same time.  It is of no importance which of them is considered to have seconded the motion.

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